Alzheimer's Risk for Women

Older women twice as likely to develop Alzheimer's as men.
3:00 | 03/19/14

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Transcript for Alzheimer's Risk for Women
And here at home, a big headline about Alzheimer's tonight. Why does the disease strike mothers, sisters, more than the man of the family? Today, a new report reveals some startling Numbers. And ABC's Mara schiavocampo has them. Reporter: Ed and peg Gleason share everything. 6 children, 11 grandchildren, decades of work, and joy. But these days, peg is facing her own unique challenge, Alzheimer's. There's been some memory loss in peg's case. But it's like we deal with it day-by-day. Reporter: Today's report showing just how common the gleasons are. Women over 65 are almost twice as likely to develop the disease as their male counterparts. One reason, age. On average, women live longer than men, with the life expectancy of 81, compared to about 76 for men. With Alzheimer's starting to spike for both sexes at 75. So, researchers say it's likely more complicated than that. And they're racing to see if genetics, hormones own differences in brain structure would play a role. There's mysteries in the brain. That's why more federal funding for research is needed to unlock the mysteries of this disease. Reporter: Women also bear another burden. They are much more likely to be caregivers. Sobering, new statistics, known firsthand by so many ma'families. Now, we move on to some

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