Battling Severe Weather and Powerful Currents Looking for Flight 370

Still no sign of missing Malaysia Airlines plane as new technology is brought to help find aircraft before it moves.
3:00 | 03/25/14

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Transcript for Battling Severe Weather and Powerful Currents Looking for Flight 370
Now, we turn the to the other urgent search tonight, in the depths of the Indian ocean. After some punishing weather, the search for the lost passenger plane has resumed. ABC's David Wright, now, on what the team is up against. Reporter: Today the search planes are back out. But the mission has changed. No longer is this a rescue. Now, it's only about recovery. And the recovery effort won't be easy on seas so stormy, the search area had to be put on hold for 24 hours. We're not just looking for a needle in a haystack. We're still looking for the haystack. Reporter: And the haystack keeps moving due to strong ocean currents. This is also what you'd call the world's largest current. Reporter: Oceanographer Charita pattiaratchi built this computer model tracing the possible debris sightings from these satellite photos back where they might have drifted from. A huge distance. The current moving 30 to 60 miles per day. You've heard of the gulf stream? This is ten-times the size of the gulf stream, the antarctic current, because it's much wider and deeper. Reporter: The ocean can be a superhighway. One year after the Japanese tsunami, debris traveled more than 3,000 miles. This Harley Davidson washed up on a beach in Canada. Now, it's in the Harley Davidson museum. These plastic Chinese bath toys washed overboard in the pacific during a storm in 1992. They have since drifted 17,000 miles to places as far flung as Alaska, England and Maine. The power of these ocean currents is one reason the search crews are racing and recover and identify some debris. The sooner do, the easier it will be to trace back where it came from. Diane? Thanks so much. David Wright, reporting in from Perth. And with so much uncertainty, they're talking about bringing in a new piece of equipment. And ABC's David Kerley is here to talk about that. This is a Navy peace of equipment. Just arrived in Perth. It will be outfitted on a ship and taken out to sea. It's kind of a bat wing. It swims. And it will swim down close to the bottom of the ocean. And it's a listening device. It will be listening for the pingers on the black boxes. If they're pulling it along, don't they have to know roughly where they're looking? Yeah. The Navy says they don't want to start until they find some debris and can track it back on the currents to narrow the search area before you start going with this towed pinger locater. And 12 more days on the battery in the black box. We're talking about the pinger, which is in the front of this black box. And the battery is guaranteed to last 30 days. That's what they say. Then, it will start to fade, kind of like a flashlight, when you turn it on and the light dims. The beeping will dim a little bit. It will be feinter. David Kerley, with the status of the search tonight. Thank you, David.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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