Grocery Shopping Tips: Watch Out for Shrinking Products

Shoppers get less bang for the buck at the supermarket.
3:00 | 09/11/12

Coming up in the next {{countdown}} {{countdownlbl}}

Coming up next:

{{nextVideo.title}}

{{nextVideo.description}}

Skip to this video now

Now Playing:

{{currentVideo.title}}

More information on this video
Enhanced full screen
Explore related content
Comments
Related Extras
Related Videos
Video Transcript
Transcript for Grocery Shopping Tips: Watch Out for Shrinking Products
Finally tonight, there's a consumer survey saying almost half of us have switched grocery stores this year looking for lower prices. Well, now a heads-up from fellow consumers, an army of eagle-eyed shoppers who have been tracking the way the amount inside some the boxes is shrinking. By the way, it's an army that includes a very young general and here's abc's elisabeth leamy. Hi, I'm here at my local discount -- Reporter: Jared goodman is half teenager, half shopping sleuth. But they're both $7.99. Reporter: He scour s grocery stores catching big brands making products smaller for the same price, and he's uncovered a surprising clue. I usually look for labels that say new and improved because that probably means the product's been downsized. Reporter: Jared is part of a growing army of shoppers who tip off this man, edgar dworsky, founder of consumerworld.Org. We've lost 12 tissues. 12 sneezes. 12 achoos gone. Reporter: We find 14 products in all that have recently gotten smaller, including maxwell house coffee. Good to the very last drop. Reporter: The last drop comes a lot sooner these days. The old can made 270 cups. The new one, same price, makes just 240. Pillsbury cake mixes recently shrank by 3 ounces. When we follow the instructions for making cupcakes, the old mix makes 24, but at the same price, the new barely stretches to make 21. Brawny never lets you down. Reporter: Check this out. You used to get another 4 1/2 feet for the same price. We asked the manufacturers what they're doing. They told us customers prefer smaller products to higher prices. And remember that tip from our 13-year-old detective? If it says new and improved. Reporter: He's right. When a product says new and improved there's no legal definition of that claim. Though it often means smaller but just as expensive. Elisabeth leamy, abc news, summerville, massachusetts.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

{"id":17214002,"title":"Grocery Shopping Tips: Watch Out for Shrinking Products","duration":"3:00","description":"Shoppers get less bang for the buck at the supermarket.","section":"WNT","mediaType":"Default"}