Instant Index: Elephants and Their Keen Ability to Hear for Survival

Diane Sawyer with the stories people have been buzzing about all week.
3:00 | 03/10/14

Coming up in the next {{countdown}} {{countdownlbl}}

Coming up next:

{{nextVideo.title}}

{{nextVideo.description}}

Skip to this video now

Now Playing:

{{currentVideo.title}}

More information on this video
Enhanced full screen
Explore related content
Comments
Related Extras
Related Videos
Video Transcript
Transcript for Instant Index: Elephants and Their Keen Ability to Hear for Survival
Our "Instant index," beginning with a wake-up call for parents. If you have a smartphone in your hand right now, you might want to put it down. Boston medical center released the results of an undercover investigation. They watched parents on absorbed in their smartphones when with their children. The more mom and dad were with the phones, the more likely they were to react harshly to their child's behavior. And it turns out dumbo's big ears aren't just for show. We learned today that wild african elephants cannot only distinguish between human voices and other voices, they can identify men versus women. Adults versus children. Even different ethnic groups. For instance, an elephant can tell the difference between two tribes in Africa. The farmers who are friends to the elephants and the cattle-herding who have been known to hunt them. The elephants develop the ability as a survival tactic. And they are remarkably accurate, no matter how similar the voices sound.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

{"id":22856285,"title":"Instant Index: Elephants and Their Keen Ability to Hear for Survival","duration":"3:00","description":"Diane Sawyer with the stories people have been buzzing about all week.","section":"WNT","mediaType":"Default"}