Jobs That Make Your Blood Boil Can Be Hazardous to Your Health

Experts say finding a way to keep cool under pressure is key to managing stress.
3:00 | 03/18/14

Coming up in the next {{countdown}} {{countdownlbl}}

Coming up next:

{{nextVideo.title}}

{{nextVideo.description}}

Skip to this video now

Now Playing:

{{currentVideo.title}}

More information on this video
Enhanced full screen
Explore related content
Comments
Related Extras
Related Videos
Video Transcript
Transcript for Jobs That Make Your Blood Boil Can Be Hazardous to Your Health
Next, here, tonight, we're going to show you something about yourself. What happens to your body when you're under intense pressure. ABC's gio Benitez looks at extreme stress for lessons about how all of us can keep it under control. Reporter: For many of us, working can be the most stressful time of our day. Among the most stressful jobs? Patrolling the streets, fighting fires, and even driving those cabs. Stress is there. Stress is everywhere. Reporter: You can see the meltdown in one of the most demanding jobs in sports, coaching. Last season, this NFL head coach suddenly collapsed onto the field. Rick Majerus died of heart failure. My colleague, John brenkus, put devices on Michigan state basketball coach Tom Izzo's body to monitor his vital signs during a tense game. Watch. Before the game, his heart rate is at 68 beats per minute. Breathing rate, 14 breaths per minute. All healthy for a 59-year-old. But just 9 minutes into the game, with the team trailing by 12 points, a shocker. His heart rate and breathing rate just about double. And then, with less than six minutes left in the game. An unflavorible call. Coach Izzo's core body temperature peaking at 100 degrees. His heart rate soaring to 135 beats per minute. Tom is just really passionate. Even though there's a lot of stress, he definitely gets it out. Reporter: And that can be dangerous if you have any kind of heart problem. It's not really the stress you can lessen. It's the response to the stress. You need to find a way to deal with that so you don't internalize it. Reporter: And if the stress is long-term, doctors say it could lead to a slew of problems, like depression, high blood pressure, even heart attacks. The best medical advice, keep cool under pressure. Gio Benitez, ABC news, New York. And you can see the full report tonight on "Nightline."

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

{"id":22962576,"title":"Jobs That Make Your Blood Boil Can Be Hazardous to Your Health","duration":"3:00","description":"Experts say finding a way to keep cool under pressure is key to managing stress.","section":"WNT","mediaType":"Default"}