Kim Jong Il Dead: Inside N. Korea

Bob Woodruff shares insights from a place few outsiders have entered.
3:56 | 12/19/11

Coming up in the next {{countdown}} {{countdownlbl}}

Coming up next:

{{nextVideo.title}}

{{nextVideo.description}}

Skip to this video now

Now Playing:

{{currentVideo.title}}

More information on this video
Enhanced full screen
Explore related content
Comments
Related Extras
Related Videos
Video Transcript
Transcript for Kim Jong Il Dead: Inside N. Korea
North Korea is a mystery nation a point brought home by this iconic picture North Korea shrouded in darkness their neighbors to the south ablaze in lights. -- Christiane ABC's Bob Woodruff was one of the few western reporters to report from North Korea three times in the last five years. Here's his reporter's notebook on life inside the hermit kingdom. We were invited to witness the first public appearance of the man today is the leader of the world's most conclusive nation we are told that -- yeah. I'm here but this -- But that's Kim Jong and is the third son his older Brothers passed over until then he had been seen only in a couple of photos LA -- -- -- -- on the edge. In North Korean style before revealing the new air they wanted to impress the world with a celebration. Children trained for up to three years for an event like this. And then suddenly the people next to us turned and applauded. Forty yards above us was their leader and his son. North Korea is one of the strangest places I've ever visit. Six years ago I saw traffic lights for show only electricity too expensive. Cars directed instead by women in militaristic. Choreography. In all three of my trips to North Korea the government's purpose was always to make a point the first in 2005. Do you have a nuclear bomb we do we want -- and we did -- then in 2008 we're the first journalists ever allowed into their nuclear facility. The images are highly orchestrated when we saw them together a senior general made clear the line of succession my first saluting father and his son. But as the dear leader moved off the stage we saw something they probably didn't want to reveal. -- -- Perhaps he chose this moment to introduce his son -- knowing his time was coming to a close. Bob Woodruff ABC news New York thanks to Bob Woodruff in -- -- ABC's David Wright in South Korea where they are on high alert tonight. Even gain -- good evening George this is a moment -- huge uncertainty in a decades old standoff between these two countries. One of the most heavily fortified borders in the world -- Just twenty miles away from here and where I'm standing is easily within artillery range of North Korean -- Remember the Korean War never officially ended and there have been Lara. Just this morning news of another missile tests and that potentially the most alarming of all what people here in South Korea here most. -- instability. The possibility of a power struggle with nuclear weapons in the -- Thanks -- from the White House now ABC's Jake Tapper Jake I know they spend some time in the White House war gaming this transition looking and all the dangerous scenarios. How do they think this transition is unfolding so far and what -- they know about Kim -- -- They don't know much about Kim -- -- of all the countries the US government wants to know about North Korea is the most closed the most opaque we know he is inexperienced he is thought to be a brash but we don't know much more about him than that in terms of the war gaming that's been going on the possible scenarios run the gamut from the most optimistic the idea that this could usher in a new era of relationships with North Korea. To the most pessimistic and that is -- Kim Jung on comes with something to prove he is only had three years to prepare for this as opposed to his father who had fourteen years and he might start off by being bellicose belligerent with South Korea some think. He was behind those attacks against South Korea in 2000 tenths -- President Obama has been laying low reaching out behind the scenes to South Korean members of his administration. Reaching out to other countries in the region Japan. China and trying to keep temperatures very very low keep things calm George thanks --

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

{"id":15192822,"title":"Kim Jong Il Dead: Inside N. Korea","duration":"3:56","description":"Bob Woodruff shares insights from a place few outsiders have entered.","section":"WNT","mediaType":"Default"}