Landmark Ruling in Student Athlete Pay A federal judge rules some college

A federal judge rules some college athletes can get paid for use of their names and images.
2:15 | 08/09/14

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Transcript for Landmark Ruling in Student Athlete Pay A federal judge rules some college
Meteorologist, Julie Durda from Miami. Thank you. Next, big changes for college athletes. Ncaa insists student athletes amateurs and could not be paid. Now a federal judge ruled they should be paid for use of their names or images. ABC's Ron Claiborne explains. Reporter: Ed o'bannon was the star offal team and won the ncaa championship in 1995. Years later after a brief pro career, he happened to see his image as a college player on a video game. I hadn't been compensated or told I was going to be on a video game. Reporter: In 2009 he filed a lawsuit demanding colleges compensate student athletes. Friday a federal court agreed finding the court finds that the challenged ncaa rules unreasonably restrain trade. This has always been the right of college athletes. Present, past and future. Reporter: The decision sent shock waves through the world of college sports where schools make hundreds of millions of dollars a year from football and basketball and television rights and marketing, while players make nothing. This decision puts an end to amateurism. Amateurism is now dead. End zone. Reporter: Under the ruling, starting in 2016, college football and basketball players will be entitled to a minimum of $5,000, for each year they play. Which they can access only after they leave college. This ruling doesn't specifically pay college athletes for their play, it specifically pays college athletes potentially for their name and likeness associated with TV broadcasts, and video games. Reporter: In a statement, the ncaa said, we disagree with the court's decision that ncaa rules violated antitrust laws. We are reviewing the full decision. And ironically, ed o'bannon and 19 other former college athletes who joined this lawsuit. They will get nothing. They gave up their right to damages by choosing to have their case heard by a judge not Byron. Nothing for ed o'bannon and the other plaintiffs. Ron Claiborne, thank you. .

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