From Military Service to Civilian Life

Afghanistan veteran Capt. Hank Hughes seeks new life as a filmmaker.
3:00 | 08/08/12

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Transcript for From Military Service to Civilian Life
Finally, it's the surge in reverse. So many americans who fought in iraq and afghanistan, retiring from the military. 300,000 this year alone. In our standing up for heros series, every division of abc news will examine the challenges facing veterans as they transition from military service. Tonight, bob woodruff starts us off, with a legendary filmmaker helping a returning captain achieve his hollywood dream. Reporter: Captain hank hughes served twice in afghanistan as a decorated platoon leader, but now he has left his military career to find a new one. What's it been like to get back here to the civilian world of the u.S.? I mean, you return home in a bit of a time machine where everyone else has moved on and you've just arrived. Reporter: Since he was a kid, he dreamed of becoming a filmmaker. Among his favorite back then? "Star wars" and "indiana jones." In college, he majored in film, but put his dreams on hold for his country. Now, he's back. What's your goal? To make movies. Reporter: For the rest of your life? I would love to. Absolutely. Reporter: So, at abc news, we got to work, finding a mentor for hank, who could guide him along his new path. And we found a film legend. These guys are heroes and we need to help them. Reporter: The man who created the movies hanked always loved. George lucas. I have some questions for you if you don't mind. Reporter: Movie making 101. Your training in the military is exactly the training you'll need. Reporter: It is face to face encounter with film history, r2d2, han solo and darth vader. It wasn't done as a trilogy. It was really done as one movie. The script was like 250 pages so I cut it in three pieces and then it became a sequel. Reporter: And while lucas taught him how to write it, his team at lucas film taught him how to make it. It's amazing george lucas would take that time out of his day to talk to me just because i was a veteran. It's fantastic. ReporteHANK, ONE OF Thousands of veterans coming home, is getting a chance to learn from a master. And just like in the movies -- the force will be with you always. Reporter: The relationship will go on. Bob woodruff, abc news, at skywalker ranch in california. And if any of you would like to see more behind the scenes at the skywalker ranch, you can go to abcnews.Com. Thank you for watching tonight. I'll see you tomorrow on "gma."

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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