Mission to Save Stranded Researcher

A risky rescue to the South Pole to save a woman trapped out in the cold
2:33 | 10/16/11

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Transcript for Mission to Save Stranded Researcher
The woman the researchers stranded at the South Pole desperately seeking help after suffering what she believes was a stroke. At last word the plane was about to arrive we've been in contact all day with a woman -- literally been standing outside of life threatening cold more than seventy degrees below zero. Watching waiting praying for help to arrive but even when that week ends the dangers will not. This is -- -- filled with risks for her and for her rescuers. The cargo plane that will carry that nuclear engineer Renee Nicole to steer away from the -- hold -- the doctor's waiting for her is now closer than ever. Flying -- originally from Chile the cargo plane made -- to the Antarctic Peninsula but was stopped short because of blizzard winds and blinding snow. Landing at a research -- -- five hours away from -- day. Tonight she emailed ABC news saying the plane was about to land sending us this image. Writing last picture inside my dorm room leaving now to go outside to wait for plane to land two -- -- And so to -- to New Hampshire woman is expected to finally leave the South Pole two months after -- she believes was a stroke. Telling ABC news she needed to get out but her speech and vision is already impaired. You could hear it in her strained voice. As I'm just sit here waiting who knows what's going on -- she is 58 and works at the national science Foundation's research station. I am very concerned about my health. And -- possible ramifications and consequences sustained here. We're certainly it was a stroke is that seems to be the most likely diagnosis but they didn't have all -- the modern equipment they don't have an MRIs to invest enough I don't think even absentees. When the plane does reach her and pick her up there will be a stopover before arriving in New Zealand the closest hospital with MRIs and CT scans. And there is enormous concern over the flight itself. Given the cabin pressure oxygen levels the person -- aircraft which is on pressurized and so this increases the potential risk to her. There have been similar rescue. Before in 1999 Jerri Nielsen FitzGerald was the only position at an isolated -- pole research station. Which -- diagnosed and treated her own breast cancer perform and a biopsy on herself. Using only ice and a local anesthetic she waited months before she got out administering her own chemotherapy while waiting. Tonight -- nickel -- -- families waiting to hear if that flight has taken off. She's been lucky so far they -- but it's impossible to tell how much danger she is in until she gets to the hospital. Again it's believed that plane we'll have a stopover before its final destination in New Zealand where doctors are in fact waiting.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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