NFL, NHL and Medical Doctors Go to Capitol Hill to Discuss Concussions

Do helmets provide adequate protection against sports related head injuries and concussions?
3:00 | 03/13/14

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Transcript for NFL, NHL and Medical Doctors Go to Capitol Hill to Discuss Concussions
Every year, 250,000 children suffer a sports-related head injury, including concussions. And today in Washington, the reality of those Numbers took center stage. Here's ABC's senior national correspondent, Jim Avila. Reporter: Americans love hard hits. But today on capitol hill, athletes, league officials and doctors, warn parents of the danger of little kids playing big kid sports, from hockey, to lacrosse, soccer and football, the most hazardous. The average high school football player, hit in the head 652 times a season. The hardest of those hits exceeds 150 Gs of force. That's like dropping a bowling ball on the player's head. But surprisingly, soccer ranged second for head injuries. Typically heading the ball up to 12 times in a single game. Watch again. This black and white sphere, traveling up to 50 miles per hour. I don't remember being hit. And I don't remember falling over. Reporter: Among those testifying, Briana scurry, who made the biggest save in American women's soccer. Stopping the Chinese and winning team usa its first world cup. But her career ended violently on this knee-to-head collision. I'm still suffering from some of the effects of that hit. Reporter: Scurry hasn't played since. And now preaches to parents the importance of recognizing a concussion and getting out of the game. You start to feel a little bit woozy or sick to your stomach, you have to tell a teammate, the referee or your coach. Reporter: Today's capitol hill witnesses, urging parents and coaches to change the culture of sport in America. Teaching athletes, large and small, amateur and pro, that playing hurt is no longer okay. Jim Avila, ABC news, Washington.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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