Two Planes, One Near-Miss

Is an air-traffic controller with a faulty headset to blame?
3:00 | 08/04/12

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Transcript for Two Planes, One Near-Miss
We move to other new, yet another close call in the sky, this time over detroit. One passenger saying he looked out the window of the plane and saw another just below them. Another explanation we haven't heard before. An air traffic controller with a faulty headset? Here's john schriffen. Reporter: This it's another situation of planes too close for comfort. This time, over detroit last night. A large delta 737 from phoenix and small regional jet approaching from different directions and different altitudes came within two miles of each other. Well within the three mile safety zone jets usually fly. Faa said the confusion came when the air traffic controller's headset began to give out broadcasting intermittently. The pilot's unable to hear all of the contributions. Obviously, that's not a desirable situation. I think perhaps even more insidious is the fact that the pilots may not know it what he or she is not hearing. Faa said there's no threat of a collision saying both pilots could see each other's planes. Both aircrafts landing safely. But this latest incident three days after another scare in the skies when three planes nearly collided over the nation's capital. It happened when a commuter plane took off in the wrong direction, headed in the path of a second jet cleared to run in the same runway. Stand bye. An alert air traffic controller saw the confusion and ordered the landing pilot to change course. I would take away the fact that the system worked. I'm never one to say that passengers need to worry about anything in this system, when we carry almost a billion people a year safely. And our safety experts said it's been 34 years since we had a mid-air collision on u.S. Airliners. David the faa said it fixed the headset problem. The most kreent incident but is investigating how it happened.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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