Rescuers Trying to Reach Victims of Deadly Avalanche

Plus, here's how to survive when the snow comes crashing down and you're trapped.
3:00 | 02/12/14

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Transcript for Rescuers Trying to Reach Victims of Deadly Avalanche
This dangerous winter weather has left so little of the country untouched. The east coast getting hit hard right now, but also out west, where this moment, rescuers in Oregon are trying to reach skiers trapped by a deadly avalanche. ABC's Clayton Sandell shows what it's like, and how to survive when snow comes crashing down. Reporter: An already deadly avalanche season just got worse. Tonight, rescuers are still trying to get two injured skiers out of the Oregon mountains, nearly 24 hours after an avalanche there killed two others. 12 people killed already. Six in less than a week. Some of the avalanches we have seen over the last couple of days are very large. Which means they could bury and destroy a car or break a building. There she goes. Reporter: The entire west is on high alert. Colorado's governor today warned people to stay out of dangerous back country terrain. Avalanches reach sppeds upwards of 60 miles an hour. Watch as this skier gets caught in a slide. He's completely covered seconds later. You can try to swim, try to fight to stay on the surface, grab a tree. There are certain avalanches that you can't do a thing. Reporter: Once traps, the chances of survival rapidly drop after just 15 minutes, as we recently learned when I was buried during an avalanche drill. One of the extra dangers is, when you exhale, your warm breath melts the snow immediately around you and then that refreezes, which just traps all of the carbon dioxide that you're exhaling and makes it even more difficult to get oxygen. New tools like these air balls can help skiers float on top of the snow. But the best way for most of us to stay safe is to always know the current conditions and always stay within the marked boundaries. Seems like this can happen well into spring. Another reminder of how quickly nature's beauty can turn deadly. Clayton Sandell, ABC news, Denver. And watch not as "Nightline" goes inside an avalanche rescue

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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