Rough Seas, Ferocious Weather Stall Search for Missing Flight 370

New satellite images show hundreds of pieces of debris.
3:00 | 03/27/14

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Transcript for Rough Seas, Ferocious Weather Stall Search for Missing Flight 370
And it was a frustrating day, today, in the urgent search for that missing passenger plane. New satellite images, more of them, showing hundreds more pieces of debris, the trail red-hot, tonight, as ferocious weather stalls the search teams. ABC's David Kerley, now, with the latest. Reporter: High above the rough Indian ocean, new satellite images from Thailand. It shows 300 floating objects. The Japanese provided images, too. Planes were grounded today by bad weather. But another high-tech U.S. Sub hunter p-8, is headed to Australia. We've seen countries provide images in what they suspect is potential debris. And all of those photos are in the same basic area. So, why isn't a vessel on the water able to recover even one piece of debris? Because this area, dubbed the roaring 40, sees waves and swells, up to 100 feet high. As we saw in this maritime simulator -- 120 meters. Reporter: A piece of debris can be lost from sight in heavy seas. It can be a case of now you see it, now you don't. But if they do find debris, investigators can start piecing together clues. We see that the wing itself, the leading edge, is blown open. Reporter: In Arizona, they teach investigators to look for cracks, signs of fire, which can indicate why a plane crashed and how it impacted. Even small pieces that have fallen off the main wreckage, may help solve the mystery. I find the smaller fragments, actually, we call cookie crumbs, usually. Reporter: And you can think of it as a trail. Allowing experts to track back the currents to the most likely spot of impact. So much to learn. Once some wreckage is found. David Kerley, ABC news, New York.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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