How to Sell Your Phone Pictures for Big Bucks

Imagine getting paid hundreds of dollars for the pictures on your cell phone.
3:00 | 03/05/14

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Transcript for How to Sell Your Phone Pictures for Big Bucks
And next, tonight, our "Real money" team is back. Americans take 80 billion digital photos every year, from selfies to sunsets. So, imagine getting paid hundreds of dollars for the pictures on your phone. ABC's gio Benitez shows us how to put that money in your pocket. Reporter: It's the power of the smartphone pick. Ellen captured it with the celebrity selfie, retweeted a record 3 million times. But we've all got them, those pictures right in our pockets. Look at the photos viewers send to "World news" every day on flickr. Selfies, snowmen, sunsets. And it turns out, all of the memories we make, could make us money, too. Meet Deana valorose. Hi, good to see you. Reporter: Each camera click on her phone worth cash. You've made more than $300 off this? Right. Reporter: Deana's selling her sports, nature, even breakfast photos through a free app called foap. Big brands buy them to use in their ad campaigns. And it's easy. You get that perfect shot, you post it online, and if someone buys the photo, well, the app splits the cash with you 50/50. Every photo on foap sells for $10. You get $5, foap gets $5. What kinds of photos really sell? The picture that I've sold the most of is parasailing. People parasailing. Reporter: Really? Yeah. They seem to like water sports. Reporter: Business is booming and here's why. It's much cheaper to buy her photos than from the pros. Foap says about half of their users are making money and some are raking it in. The guy who took these photos made almost 4 grand in less than a year. And some big brands are now sending users out on specific missions. Mastercard wanted priceless moments and paid Adam Hamilton $500 for this pic of his son playing in the snow. And puma, looking for soccer pics, paid a whopping $2,000 for this photo. This is the real deal. It's the real deal. Reporter: It's "Real money." "Real money." And gio is here, now. Bradley cooper took that Oscar photo. It's the person who snaps it, not the owner of the camera. Reporter: And you have to make sure if you're taking a photo of someone else, you have to get their permission, Diane. Gio Benitez reporting And does your town have the worst gridlock in America?

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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