West Virginia Water Emergency Enters Day Four

Questions about why chemicals are there with no inspection or oversight surface.
3:00 | 01/12/14

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Transcript for West Virginia Water Emergency Enters Day Four
where hundreds of thousands of families are facing a new week without water, after the giant chemical spill. Tonight, how long were those chemicals there without being inspected? Abc's susan saulny in west virginia. Reporter: Today, officials raced to complete hundreds of tests of the drinking water around the charleston area. What they're finding is encouraging. More samples coming back showing a low level of chemical in the water. But an all-clear for the water supply here could still be days away. The region's entire plumbing system, every house, every business, every building, will need to be flushed. I believe that we're at a point where we can say that we see light at the end of the tunnel. Reporter: But now, the first look inside the containment wall that leaked 7,500 gallons of a toxin into the river. You can actually see where there were cracks in it, where the chemical came through it. The condition of the plant was not good. The danger was known to the previous owner and the danger was known to the current owner. Reporter: And more questions about the chemical plant responsible for the leak, upstream from a water plant serving 300,000 people. State officials say inspections weren't required, because the company didn't produce the chemical, only stored it. For now, most businesses are shut. Downtown charleston is a ghost town and most schools will be closed again tomorrow. And frustration mounts. Many of the people at this jam-packed soup kitchen told us, they just want can water in their homes. I have three babies. They are 5, 6 and 8. We're bathing them out of the sink. Reporter: With many people here saying they've been suffering from headaches and nausea because of the leak, officials they say plan to monitor the residents for years to come.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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