This Week on ‘NY Med’: A 26 Year Old Woman Convinces Doctors that “Yes She Can” Have Her Miracle

By David Ford

Aug 13, 2012 12:34pm

Plus: The ER Staff Is Rattled When A Patient They Know Intimately Turns Up In Dire Straits

And: A Promising Resident Is Taken to the Wood Shed By A Senior Surgeon

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For a full year ABC News cameras had unprecedented access to document the mayhem and the miracles that occur daily inside the walls of Columbia and Weill Cornell Medical Centers — the crown jewels of the prestigious New York-Presbyterian Hospital in New York City — for the eight-part series “NY Med.” Lutheran Medical Center also participated, adding a Brooklyn dimension to the series. In “Episode 106,” which airs TUESDAY, AUGUST 14 (10:00-11:00 p.m., ET), viewers will meet the following patients, doctors and nurses:

Lyndsey McLaughlin is the life of the party.  She is a 26 year-old who dreams of touring the world and learning to surf. But what holds her back are her dying lungs. Lyndsey has Cystic Fibrosis, a disease she cannot survive unless she is fortunate enough to get a lung transplant. With time running out, Lyndsey is accompanied by friends and family on a “booze cruise” around Manhattan. As dawn breaks, doctors try frantically to locate her with the urgent news that a donor is available.

The ER’s triumvirate of sassy nurses return.  In a case that viewers are sure to remember, Diana Costine cleans up a homeless woman named Virginia who is a familiar face to the entire staff. Within days Virginia is back, but this time unconscious and critically ill. Photos of Virginia as a young woman reveal a beautiful coed with a promising life in front of her. How did things go so badly wrong?  Meanwhile, nurse Katie Duke good naturedly treats a patient who breaks the sound barrier with her psychotic screaming.  Nurse Marina Dedivanovic cares for an elderly man whose wife of 65 years recounts the heartwarming story of how the couple first met.  It triggers an epiphany for Marina, who decides to make a dramatic change in her love life.

Surgical residents Anthony Watkins and Arundi Mahendran return to share the trials and tribulations of being schooled by exacting senior surgeons. Anthony has grown so dependent on Arundi’s companionship that she thinks he’s jealous when they are apart. Meanwhile Arundi comforts a nervous patient with a low tolerance for pain.

“NY Med” follows the irascible, compassionate and, at times, cocky attending surgeons who try to change the trajectory of lives by relying on sheer medical brilliance and a healthy dose of old fashioned good luck.  The eight-part series takes a candid look at how cutting edge medicine often makes the difference, although even the best surgeons can find themselves flirting with disaster. The raucous ER staff trades jibes with strong-willed New Yorkers in moments that can be poignantly heartbreaking or off-the-hook hilarious. These doctors spend far more time with each other than with their families, developing complicated and intertwined personal relationships.

Terence Wrong is executive producer of “NY Med.” Erica Baumgart and Chris Perera are supervising producers. Monica DelaRosa is series producer and Andy Genovese is the broadcast producer.

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