Headlines » Picture This: ABC News http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/headlines The latest Headlines, news and blog posts from ABC News contributors and bloggers. Fri, 19 Sep 2014 23:01:04 +0000 en hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.2.1 Photos of New York Reflected in Glass http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/headlines/2014/07/photos-of-new-york-reflected-in-glass/ http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/headlines/2014/07/photos-of-new-york-reflected-in-glass/#comments Tue, 08 Jul 2014 14:00:15 +0000 Kate Bubacz http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/headlines/?p=523291 Donna Dotan has a self-described obsession with symmetry. Her prowess with architectural photography is well applied in her personal project, “Reflections from Above,” where she captures striking images of New York City reflected in the glass of skyscrapers. She describes the project as a treasure hunt, and says that she is looking for an all-glass skyscraper to add more reflections to her series.

 

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Despite the dizzying heights that Dotan takes us to with her images, she is not totally blase about heights. “If I have an opportunity to get a great shot, all my fears usually melt away and I remain focused on my task.”

 

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“Having said that, some of the shots that I got for this series were taken from the rooftop of an 800-foot tall building that I was on for a commissioned cityscape shot. The thought of looking down didn’t even cross my mind until my partner (and husband) Brian noticed that the building was all-glass and begged me to give it a try. I was extremely hesitant, but decided I had to try or else I’d regret it. I wrapped the camera strap a few times around my wrist and pointed the camera straight down using the Live View function so that I could see the shot from above. Well you know what happened after that,” she says.

 

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To see more of Donna Dotan’s work, visit her website. For more featured photographycurated by ABC News’ photo editors, and at Picture This, the ABC News photography blog.

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An iPhone Is All You Need to Capture Instagram-Ready Fireworks http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/headlines/2014/07/an-iphone-is-all-you-need-to-capture-instagram-ready-fireworks/ http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/headlines/2014/07/an-iphone-is-all-you-need-to-capture-instagram-ready-fireworks/#comments Fri, 04 Jul 2014 14:03:28 +0000 Jared T. Miller http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/headlines/?p=523146  

gty fireworks kb 140703 16x9t 608 An iPhone Is All You Need to Capture Instagram Ready Fireworks

The only thing better than finding the perfect place to watch fireworks this Fourth of July? Nailing a shot of the action that isn’t blurry, blown-out or pitch-black.

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But don’t worry about bringing the fancy SLR with you. Enjoy the holiday, and reach for the camera closest to you: the one in your pocket. Keep these tips in mind when shooting the nighttime displays, and you’ll have Instagram-ready masterpieces, instead of the duds unbecoming a tech-savvy reveler.

STABILITY

First thing’s first: The biggest reason for blurry photos is that a smartphone shakes easily when handheld. That’s not usually a problem in good light, but the problem is exacerbated in trickier situations like shooting fireworks.

The easiest way to ensure your phone is perfectly still is to use a tripod; but since this is an iPhone, and its portability is one of its best assets, why not pick one that’ll let you experiment? The <a href=”http://joby.com/gorillapod/original“> Gorillapod</a> is great for trick shots, as its natural tripod shape can be bent around railings and other stable, but uneven, surfaces. Besides cellphones, it’s also good for smaller point-and-shoot cameras and GoPro-style video cameras.

But if you’re not in the mood to spend, use your surroundings to your advantage. Prop your phone on a nearby ledge or lean back against flat surfaces to brace your arms while holding the camera. And if you need to angle your phone upwards, a wallet is a surprisingly useful tripod as well.

EXPOSURE

Though the iPhone’s automatic settings usually ensure great photos, it’s harder for the phone to do its job in low-light situations like shooting fireworks displays.

So take it easy on the hardware and tweak a few exposure-related settings. Turn off HDR shooting, which slows down the camera’s shooting ability. Turn off your flash, in this case it’ll have no effect on the subject of your photo (the fireworks), and will only throw off the camera’s auto-exposing ability.

And when the first fireworks go off, tap the part of the screen where the action is to set the iPhone’s exposure and focus; the less you move, the more that setting will apply to all the photos you take. You might have to reset it a few times throughout the event, but tapping the screen temporarily locks the focus and exposure to make your shots consistent.

TECHNIQUE

Now that you’ve got the basics of the technology working for you, there are a few issues with technique to keep in mind.

First, don’t zoom! Though it may seem like you’re framing the shot better, the phone’s digital zoom can’t get you closer without adding grainy artifacts to your shot, and making it harder to focus and hold the camera steady.

Also, avoid shooting frames with streetlights or other light sources in them; your phone will try to expose them correctly, and will throw the exposure of the fireworks off in the process.

Use the phone’s burst mode to capture several alternate shots of the same burst of fireworks, and you’ll have options to choose from when you check your photos afterwards.

POST

If you’re lucky, you’ll get the perfect shot on the first try. But most likely you’ll end up with well-exposed photos that need a bit of tweaking.

Now’s the time to zoom in on your favorite burst of color. Cropping the image after the fact, instead of beforehand using the digital zoom, will preserve the color and depth of the photo, and, except for extreme crops, will leave minimal static or camera noise artifacts.

If the color’s slightly off, the iPhone’s “Auto Enhance” feature does an admirable job of correcting exposure. Several other apps, like <a href=”http://campl.us“>Camera+</a>, also have robust sets of photo-editing tools.

But assuming you’re posting this photo to Instagram, the app recently introduced tools that allow for serious tweaks. Bumping up the contrast will help make the colors deeper, as will adding saturation. You can fine-tune from there using the “highlights” and “shadows” sliders, which affect only limited areas of the color spectrum of your photograph.

That’s it! Send your results to #ABC4th
and look for the best on ABCnews.com!

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Remembering Camille Lepage, Photojournalist Killed in Africa http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/headlines/2014/05/remembering-camille-lepage-photojournalist-killed-in-africa/ http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/headlines/2014/05/remembering-camille-lepage-photojournalist-killed-in-africa/#comments Tue, 13 May 2014 23:11:30 +0000 Kate Bubacz http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/headlines/?p=520043 gty camille lepage 01 kb 140513 3x2 608 Remembering Camille Lepage, Photojournalist Killed in AfricaFrench journalist Camille Lepage is seen in this picture taken in Bangui, Central African Republic on Feb. 19, 2014. (Fred Dufour/AFP/Getty Images)

The French government has confirmed the death of Camille Lepage, a 26-year -old photojournalist working in the Central African Republic. The country is wracked with political instability,  resulting in widespread violence, internal displacement and sectarian tension. Her body was found by French peacekeeping troops on May 13, 2014.

“Everything will be done to uncover the circumstances of this assassination and to track down who murdered our compatriot,” read the statement from President François Hollande’s office.

She had previously worked in South Sudan, where she moved in 2012. Below is a selection of her work.


This photo was posted to Camille’s Instagram account on April 15, 2014 with the caption, “Off to Bangui!”


This is the last photo posted to Camille’s Instagram page, on May 6, 2014, with the caption, “Travelling with the Anti Balaka to Amada Gaza, about 120km from Berberati, we left at 3.30am to avoid the Misca checkpoints and it took us 8 hours by motorbike as there is no proper roads to reach the village. In the region of Amada Gaza, 150 people were killed by the Seleka between March and now. Another attack took place on Sunday killing 6 people, the anti balaka Colonel Rock decides to send his elements there to patrol around and take people who fled to the bush back to their homes safely. #photojournalism #photography #carcrisis #documentary #latergram #antibalaka”

 

rt camille lepage 02 kb 140513 3x2 608 Remembering Camille Lepage, Photojournalist Killed in AfricaModels wait backstage during a fashion show organized by designer and stylist Sonia Bafonga to celebrate International Women’s Day with the theme of promoting peace, Bangui, Central African Republic, March 8, 2014. (Camille Lepage/Reuters)

 

rt camille lepage 03 kb 140513 3x2 608 Remembering Camille Lepage, Photojournalist Killed in AfricaAnti-balaka fighters from the town of Bossembele rest while on patrol in the Boeing district of Bangui, Central African Republic, Feb. 24, 2014. (Camille Lepage/Reuters)

 

gty camille lepage 03 kb 140513 3x2 608 Remembering Camille Lepage, Photojournalist Killed in AfricaA man injured during tribal clashes that erupted in Jonglei State, sits in a hospital in Bor, South Sudan on July 15, 2012. (Camille Lepage/AFP/Getty Images)

 

gty camille lepage 05 kb 140513 22x15 608 Remembering Camille Lepage, Photojournalist Killed in AfricaYoung refugees play on an aircraft that crashed in November 2012 on the Yida airstrip near the Yida refugee camp in South Sudan, Feb. 1, 2013. The Yida refugee camp houses over 60,000 refugees which have fled from the conflict area of South Kordofan in Sudan. (Camille Lepage/AFP/Getty Images)

 

gty camille lepage 06 kb 140513 3x2 608 Remembering Camille Lepage, Photojournalist Killed in AfricaShoes lined-up outside as men pray inside the mosque in Juba, South Sudan on the first day of Ramadan, July 20, 2012. (Camille Lepage/AFP/Getty Images)

 

gty camille lepage 07 kb 140513 23x15 608 Remembering Camille Lepage, Photojournalist Killed in AfricaPeter, an SPLA soldier and amputee sits at the Rehabilitation Centre of Juba, South Sudan, Oct. 10, 2012. Peter stepped on a mine during the war in 1992. In South Sudan, due to the lack of hospitals and infrastructure, simple injuries can be left untreated for months which increases the risk of surgical amputation as the only course of action. (Camille Lepage/AFP/Getty Images)

 

gty camille lepage 08 kb 140513 3x2 608 Remembering Camille Lepage, Photojournalist Killed in AfricaA child from South Sudan’s Bari tribe stands at the entrance into a compound near Gudele market in Juba, South Sudan, Jan. 23, 2012. Gudele was the scene of the murder of writer Isaiah Abraham, an outspoken critic of the government whose death has raised concerns over press freedom in the fledgling nation, according to US embassy officials. (Camille Lepage/AFP/Getty Images)

 

To see more of Camille Lepage’s work, please visit her website

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World’s Largest Pinhole Camera Takes World’s Largest Photo http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/headlines/2014/05/worlds-largest-pinhole-camera-takes-worlds-largest-photo/ http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/headlines/2014/05/worlds-largest-pinhole-camera-takes-worlds-largest-photo/#comments Tue, 13 May 2014 20:06:58 +0000 Jeff Swartz http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/headlines/?p=520005 “The Great Picture” is a black and white panoramic print of Marine Corps Air Station El Toro, an old military outpost. The print measures 111 feet wide by 32 feet high on seamless white muslin cloth.

Created in 2006 by six artists using an abandoned F-18 hangar in Irvine, California, as a camera, not only did they create the world’s largest print photograph, they used the world’s largest pinhole camera to produce it. By light-sealing the hangar, and using the light sensitive cloth, the “camera” took a panoramic shot of the base.

 


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The Great Picture (Caters News)

The image was originally produced as part of the Legacy Project, a photographic and historical record of the base before being transformed into what is now the Orange County Great Park.

After producing the negative, 80 volunteers helped with the development of the print in custom trays the size of an Olympic-sized swimming pool. The Great Picture has been on display across the United States since 2007 and can currently be viewed at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington until November 2014.

 

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The Great Picture, close-up detail. (Caters News)

 

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The Great Picture. (Caters News)

For further information of the display, visit the Smithsonian’s website.

 

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Slain Journalist Chris Hondros’ Intense War Photos, Writing Published in ‘Testament’ http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/headlines/2014/04/slain-journalist-chris-hondros-intense-war-photos-writing-published-in-testament/ http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/headlines/2014/04/slain-journalist-chris-hondros-intense-war-photos-writing-published-in-testament/#comments Tue, 08 Apr 2014 22:53:03 +0000 Jared T. Miller http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/headlines/?p=516613 HT chris hondros testament 5 jtm 140408 5x4 992 Slain Journalist Chris Hondros Intense War Photos, Writing Published in Testament

The cover of "Testament, " by Chris Hondros. (Chris Hondros/Getty Images)

Speaking in 2010 about his “Sound + Vision” project that paired his favorite music with his own photography from Iraq and Afghanistan, Chris Hondros explained his hopes for viewers of the work:

“Sometimes in news photography and so on, the pictures are a little bit dry, and put on the page and just set in a journalistic way in front of you,” Hondros said. “But I think there’s room to allow the emotions and basic feelings to manifest itself when you start looking at war imagery of this kind.”

Hondros’ writing on the music that mattered to him while reporting–and much more–is being published in Testament, a book of Hondros’ work being released tomorrow by Getty Images and Powerhouse books. But the statement applies broadly to the new release of Hondros’ images of war, and encapsulates the care that went into its compilation beyond the images themselves.

It’s not simply a “best-of.” That sort of book would be a challenge to compile because of the extraordinary photographic ability of the late photographer, but it’d also be a disservice to a man whose intellectual statements extended far beyond the range of his camera’s lens.

Instead, “Testament” is the collaborative effort of Getty Images’ Alexandra Ciric and Francisco P. Bernasconi and Hondros’ fiancée, Christina Paia, and the result is an incredibly personal view of the photographer’s work. The book’s planning stages began in 2011, several months after Hondros died in Misurata, Libya, from injuries sustained in a mortar attack that also killed photojournalist Tim Hetherington. As the editors at Getty, personal friends of Hondros, pored over his work, Paia reported she had found a manuscript that Hondros left behind, which seemed to be part of the book of writing he had mentioned to Paia he’d wanted to publish.

The wealth of information warranted a different approach than usual. In an interview with the New York Times, Bernasconi, now vice president of Getty Images News, mentioned the overwhelming amount of images available–Hondros’ meticulous archiving meant the editors were able to see nearly all the images from any given assignment, indicating how Hondros navigated battlefields and daily life as he filed photos to his editors.

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A U.S. Marine pulls down a picture of Saddam Hussein at a school, April 16, 2003 in Al-Kut, Iraq. (Chris Hondros/Getty Images)

On a couple of occasions, that meant leaving a wider range of photography intact. Both his work from the Liberian civil war in 2003 and his images of children who had just witnessed their parents killed at a traffic stop in Tal Afar, Iraq in 2005 are arranged in a grid, adding to the range and establishing a chronology for the images. Though some will remember his work from both war zones distilled to a single, more famous, image, the wider edit offers emotional context and adds poignancy to the work. His “Window on Baghdad,” a series of photos of the Iraqi capital shot through the window of the Humvee he was traveling in, is also arranged in a similar manner.

Despite the difficulty of speaking for a photographer who was silenced while doing the work that mattered most to him, the sheer volume of personal written accounts and commentary from Hondros as well as photo editing by those who knew and loved him approach that ideal. Who better to reflect upon the images that speak loudest to Hondros’ work than those who edited it as it arrived at their desks each day? Who better to speak to the images than the photographer himself and those who knew him best?

“Testament” is just that; whether titled as a purposeful reference to the portion of a will that determines what will happen to a person’s valuables after their death or not, it testifies accurately to several facts of Hondros’ life. It is an enormous, comprehensive testimony of wars, military actions and daily life in war zones, but it is also a testament to his personal commitment to finding the humanity in each subject he photographed. And it is a testament to the strength of character that saw Hondros through so many days spent shooting, and the mindset that sent him again and again on dangerous assignments backed by a belief that the stories were worth telling.

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Chris Hondros in Tahrir Square, Egypt. (Scout Tufankjian)

Though the locations varied, Hondros found a more universal rationale for picking up the camera for each successive story:

“One of the things I believe in, is a sense of human nature.” Hondros said. “A sense of shared humanity above the cultural layers we place on ourselves [which don't] mean that much compared to the human experience.”

“Testament” is available  from Powerhouse Books.

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War Photographer Captures Fallout From Combat at Home, Abroad http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/headlines/2014/03/war-photographer-captures-fallout-from-combat-at-home-abroad/ http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/headlines/2014/03/war-photographer-captures-fallout-from-combat-at-home-abroad/#comments Mon, 24 Mar 2014 21:40:14 +0000 Kate Bubacz http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/headlines/?p=514618 “Disco Night Sept 11,” a new book by Red Hook Editions, presents Magnum photographer Peter van Agtmael’s powerful documentation of America’s involvement in the post-9/11 wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. “Disco Nights 9/11″ is one of the first books that simultaneously looks at the effects of war at home and in the field. Van Agtmael’s images are accompanied by anecdotes, interviews and snippets of conversation. The book is available for pre-order, and a selection of images has been made available to ABC News Picture This.

ht disco nights agtmael 10 BLOG kb 140324 War Photographer Captures Fallout From Combat at Home, AbroadA few minutes earlier, Marines on patrol had noticed some suspicious activity. A motorcycle had driven by slowly, the driver staring at them intently. From a nearby ditch there was clearly someone watching their movements. As the troops walked down the road, an IED exploded and several men disappeared into the cloud, but no one was killed or badly hurt. The Marines gathered themselves and crossed a dry irrigation canal to another road.

The commander ordered five men from the town to come to their position. Five village elders complied warily. The radio picked up chatter among the Taliban suggesting another bomb was hidden by the road. At gunpoint the commander questioned the men. To one old man he yelled, “That bomb went off because you didn’t stop them!” The man responded, pleadingly, “I don’t know anything, so how could I stop it?” The commander waved him off, “Alright, get away from here, alright.” After questioning the elders, the Americans forced them to form a human shield. The Afghans were told to fan out across the road and walk forward in tandem. The Marines followed cautiously behind. As reporter Dexter Filkins and I began documenting these actions, the Marine commander halted the patrol and decided to return to base. (Mian Poshteh, Helmand, Afghanistan, 2009)

ht disco nights agtmael 11 BLOG kb 140324 War Photographer Captures Fallout From Combat at Home, AbroadThe wary inhabitants of this isolated village in Nineveh had never seen an American patrol, and asked what country they were from. They had heard of America, and served sugary tea to the soldiers but otherwise kept their distance. The troops took turns riding the donkey and posed for pictures holding lambs. In the Bible, Nineveh is described as a wicked city. God sent the prophet Jonah to preach there, and its inhabitants repented. God decided to spare the city. (Nineveh, Iraq, 2006)

ht disco nights agtmael 03 BLOG kb 140324 War Photographer Captures Fallout From Combat at Home, AbroadAmerican soldiers on a foot patrol noticed that two young men were eying them and fidgeting. Anticipating violence, they stormed their house. During the search the soldiers teased a young medic about his virginity. The soldiers had already searched hundreds of houses during their deployment, and the banter was casual as they swept the family’s possessions onto the floor. In the next room they were questioning a boy. “Have there been any new faces around the house lately?” “Are your brothers coming and going at strange hours?”

The boy muttered noncommittal answers and stared at the ground. They found no contraband in the house, but the hands of the young men came up with a faint residue of explosives. The lieutenant in charge of the platoon decided to detain them, though he thought they were innocent. The explosives tests were notoriously unreliable. They were blindfolded, and their hands bound with zip ties. The rest of the family began screaming and beating their chests. The soldiers locked them in a room and pushed the two stumbling men toward the Stryker. (Mosul, Iraq, 2006)

 

ht disco nights agtmael 04 BLOG kb 140324 War Photographer Captures Fallout From Combat at Home, AbroadA Marine after a firefight with the Taliban. (Mian Poshteh, Helmand, Afghanistan, 2009)

ht disco nights agtmael 02 BLOG kb 140324 War Photographer Captures Fallout From Combat at Home, AbroadA drill sergeant watches recruits performing combat lifesaving techniques. Several soldiers mimic brutal injuries, screaming and writhing, a few faintly smirking. The recruits bandage the injured and get them out of the “kill zone” while others provide cover. Their movements are slow and clumsy. A man in a black-billed hat films the action for later review. The instructors shake their heads and frown but say the exercise will run smoothly with more practice. Ultimately, most soldiers injured on the battlefield survive even the most grievous wounds. (Fort Jackson, S.C., 2011)


ht disco nights agtmael 05 BLOG kb 140324 War Photographer Captures Fallout From Combat at Home, AbroadA U.S. Blackhawk helicopter lands at the Ranch House, a small American outpost deep in the mountains of eastern Afghanistan. There were no decent roads and all medevacs, re-supply and transport were done by helicopter. Blackhawks were in short supply, forcing the U.S. military to turn to outside contractors. They rented ex-Soviet helicopters, rickety and ancient and known as “Jingle Air.” They came with pilots, some of whom had served in the Russian Army during the previous war in Afghanistan. They were storied figures, legendary for their bravery under fire and rumored to be heavy vodka drinkers in flight. (Waigul Valley, Nuristan, Afghanistan, 2007)

 

ht disco nights agtmael 06 BLOG kb 140324 War Photographer Captures Fallout From Combat at Home, AbroadSgt. Jackson rested in the living room while his platoon searched the rest of the house for a suspected insurgent. They found nothing suspicious, and the commander assumed he had received bad intelligence. Most of the raids I witnessed were dry holes. Before leaving, the commanding officer would occasionally compensate for damage by pressing a wad of soiled dinars or dollars into wary hands. Usually the platoon would leave without an apology to continue searching for their target, or return to base before insurgents had the chance to organize and attack. (Rawa, Iraq, 2006)

 

ht disco nights agtmael 07 BLOG kb 140324 War Photographer Captures Fallout From Combat at Home, AbroadUsually the stray dogs hanging around Patrol Base California were welcomed by the soldiers. But I was told that a few weeks earlier when one of the dogs urinated on a soldier’s cot he and his buddies taped a grenade to the dog’s jaw and pulled the pin. During the tour of the 1st Battalion, 32nd Regiment, 3rd Brigade of the U.S. Army’s 10th Mountain Division, California was attacked over eighty times. The patrol base was situated on a dirt road that skirted the winding and fast moving Pech River. It was small and crowded. The soldiers lived in sandbagged bunkers. Gas generators rattled in the trench line. The soldiers ate prepackaged food, MREs. There was no running water, showers or phones. When not on patrol, they passed the days playing cards and video games, and watching movies. A few times a week, trucks brought fresh food and every two weeks a squad would spend twenty-four hours at a larger base down the road, cleaning up and calling home. Three Humvees with heavy weapons were parked along the perimeter and constantly manned, scanning the ridgeline across the river. At dusk some soldiers would slip away to the Afghan bunkers to smoke hash. Two had already been caught, sent home and dismissed from the Army. (Pech Valley, Kunar, Afghanistan, 2007)

 

ht disco nights agtmael 08 BLOG kb 140324 War Photographer Captures Fallout From Combat at Home, AbroadRosie Ricketts wakes up her son Aiden before the viewing of her husband Seth, killed in Afghanistan the previous week. The temporary coffin carrying Seth Ricketts arrived at Dover Air Force Base on March 2. The bodies of dead soldiers are brought back to Dover and their families are often on hand to attend a brief ceremony as the flag-wrapped cases are removed from the plane and taken to the mortuary. The ban on media coverage of these transfers, in place during the Bush Administration, was lifted in February 2009 when Secretary of Defense Robert Gates ruled it was the families’ choice if the press should be allowed to photograph the return of their dead. In general, about half the families consent to coverage. (Glen Mississippi, 2010)

 

ht disco nights agtmael 09 BLOG kb 140324 War Photographer Captures Fallout From Combat at Home, AbroadRaymond Hubbard with his children, Brady and Riley. Since his injuries, Raymond has become an avid collector of “Star Wars” memorabilia. This is one of several family photos I took at Raymond’s request. (Darien, Wisconsin, 2007)

 

ht disco nights agtmael 01 BLOG kb 140324 War Photographer Captures Fallout From Combat at Home, AbroadA sign outside Arbor Ridge Catering and Banquet Hall advertising a 1970s-style Disco Night. An ad for the event promised: “Dress your retro best and boogie on down! Break out your bell-bottoms and polish your platforms! There will be prizes for Best Dressed and Best Dancer.” (Hopewell Junction, New York, 2010)

 

ht disco nights agtmael 12 kb BLOG 140324 War Photographer Captures Fallout From Combat at Home, AbroadBobby Henline didn’t realize how badly he was injured until he returned home. When that sank in, he prayed for God to take him in his sleep. He didn’t want to be a burden on his family. (Houston, Texas, 2013)

All images are courtesy of Peter van Agtmael and Red Hoook Editions. To see more of Peter’s work, visit his website. For more featured photography curated by ABC News’ photo editors, and at Picture This, the ABC News photography blog.

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The Best Photos You Haven’t Seen: Pictures of the Year International http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/headlines/2014/02/pictures-of-the-year-international/ http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/headlines/2014/02/pictures-of-the-year-international/#comments Tue, 25 Feb 2014 19:44:05 +0000 Kate Bubacz http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/headlines/?p=511147  The Best Photos You Havent Seen: Pictures of the Year International

Feature, First Place: Impoverished African migrants crowd the night shore of Djibouti, trying to capture inexpensive cellphone signals from neighboring Somalia, a tenuous link to relatives abroad. For more than 60,000 years our species has been relying on such intimate social connections to spread across the Earth. (John Stanmeyer)

 

Pictures of the Year International is a competition that began in 1944 at the University of Missouri School of Journalism in Columbia, Mo. Each year since, the best examples of photography from around the world are submitted for judging by a select panel of editors, scholars and fellow photographers.

The original intent was to “to pay tribute to those press photographers and newspapers which, despite tremendous war-time difficulties, are doing a splendid job; to provide an opportunity for photographers of the nation to meet in open competition; and to compile and preserve…a collection of the best in current, home-front press pictures,” according to the university.

The collection of results that is posted at the end of February is one of the finest examples of photojournalism in the world. Some of the pictures that win the contest have not graced the front pages of papers and website home pages, but others are well known. Below is a sample of the 2014 winners. For the complete list of winners, please visit www.poyi.org

 

 The Best Photos You Havent Seen: Pictures of the Year International Feature, Second Place: Bassel Barhoum, center, yells angrily after looking inside his brother’s casket at his funeral in the village of Daqaqa in Latakia Province, Syria. Abu Layth died while fighting as an officer in the Syrian Army. (Andrea Bruce)

 

 The Best Photos You Havent Seen: Pictures of the Year International Third Place, Feature: Eight-month-old Samiullah, suffering from marasmus, another sign of advanced malnutrition in which the child’s face looks like that of a wrinkled old man because skin hangs so loosely, is held by his mother, Islam Bib,i as they receive treatment on a plastic mattress in an administrative office because of overcrowding in the Inpatient Therapeutic Feeding Centre (ITFC) wards, at the Bost Hospital, a Medecins Sans Frontiers (MSF) assisted hospital, Sept. 23, 2013, in Lashkar Gah, in Helmand Province, Afghanistan. (Daniel Berehulak)

 

 The Best Photos You Havent Seen: Pictures of the Year International General News, Second Place: After surviving the collapse of his home, a civilian walks away from the scene of a regime airstrike that leveled a large part of one of Aleppo’s residential neighborhoods. (Sebastiano Tomada)

 

 The Best Photos You Havent Seen: Pictures of the Year International General News, Third Place: Prisoners who were opposition fighters and caught by Syrian security and accused of making car bombs and explosives seen in Damascus prison, Aug. 18, 2013. (Sergey Ponomarev).

 

 The Best Photos You Havent Seen: Pictures of the Year International Spot News, First Place: Two victims amid the rubble of a garment factory building collapse in Savar, near Dhaka, Bangladesh. More than 1,000 workers died in the building collapse April 24, 2013. (Taslima Akhter)

 

ht poyi spot 3 kb 140224 blog 2 The Best Photos You Havent Seen: Pictures of the Year International Spot News, Third Place: Boston Police officers Rachel McGuire, Kevin McGill and Javier Pagan react to a second terrorist bomb exploding at the Boston Marathon. They had started to run after the first bomb exploded next to them near the finish line of the Boston Marathon, which knocked down runner Bill Effrig. (John Tlumacki/The Boston Globe)

 

 The Best Photos You Havent Seen: Pictures of the Year International Disaster Coverage, Second Place: A ship is seen after it was thrown on to land as a woman holds her young child in an area of Tacloban, Philippines, that was devastated by Typhoon Haiyan in this picture taken Nov. 30, 2013. Typhoon Haiyan, know to locals as Yolanda, was one of the strongest recorded storms to make landfall after it hit Nov. 8, 2013, leaving more than 6,000 dead and millions of others homeless. (Kevin Frayer)

 

 The Best Photos You Havent Seen: Pictures of the Year International  Disaster Coverage, Third Place: A woman stuck in her car is rescued from flood waters by a resident standing on top of her car during heavy rain in Chalandri suburb, north of Athens. (Yannis Kolesidis)

 

 The Best Photos You Havent Seen: Pictures of the Year International Science, First Place:  For our two-year lion project, we centered our work around the females of the Vumbi pride, raising cubs in the difficult feast and famine of the Serengeti plains. We also focused on this black-maned male, one of two resident coalition males. The researchers called him C-Boy. Image made with invisible infrared light. (Michael Nichols/National Geographic)

 

 The Best Photos You Havent Seen: Pictures of the Year International Science, Third Place: Panda costumes are worn by caretakers inside the Wolong Nature Reserve managed by the China Conservation and Research Center for the Giant Panda. Babies are born in a quiet moss and as they grow they are moved to progressively bigger, more complex enclosures, eventually learning to climb and forage for themselves. From birth, a panda slated for release will never see a human, its training administered equally by its mother and its unseen keepers in panda costumes. (Ami Vitale)

 

 The Best Photos You Havent Seen: Pictures of the Year International

Photographer of the Year, Newspapers: When Arefa, center, met doctors shortly after her arrival to Los Angeles, they told the sisters, Jami and Staci, who were acting as her caretakers during her stay in United States, that her head wound was severely infected. The surgery Arefa came for would have to wait. The infection and her malnutrition made it too risky to operate. The sisters needed to help her get her strength back and Arefa soon settled into a routine. During the day, she spent hours at playgrounds, climbing ladders and barreling down slides, smiling. But she grew tense whenever she saw TV images of helicopters and war. (Barbara Davidson/Los Angeles Times)

 

 The Best Photos You Havent Seen: Pictures of the Year International Environmental Vision Award:  Some women stealing coal in the Dhanbad area of India, close to the coal mine. It is dangerous because police patrol all the area and often they make a lot of arrests. (Erik Messori)

 

 The Best Photos You Havent Seen: Pictures of the Year International

World Understanding Award: Many Somalis will take their mentally ill relatives to traditional, or Khoranic, healers for treatment. Mogadishu, Somalia. May 2011. (Robin Hammond/Panos)

All images are courtesy of Pictures of the Year International. For more featured photography curated by ABC News’ photo editors, and at Picture This, the ABC News photography blog.

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Face in the Crowd http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/headlines/2014/01/face-in-the-crowd/ http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/headlines/2014/01/face-in-the-crowd/#comments Thu, 16 Jan 2014 12:00:46 +0000 Sarah Kobos http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/headlines/?p=506025  

You need not step inside a gallery to see Alex Prager’s newest work. Since this blog was first published, IFC hired her to shoot the promotional photos for season four of “Portlandia.” The advertisements can currently be seen in the New York subway. Face in the Crowd

Prager’s photographs are meant to be viewed large, so subway advertisements are a surprisingly perfect platform.

 Face in the Crowd

Alex Prager’s first solo museum show in the U.S., “Face in the Crowd” presents 29 photographs and four films, as well as her newest body of work by the same name. It’s up at the Corcoran Gallery of Art until March 9, 2014 and it is worth a visit. Upon walking into the exhibit, one is surrounded by massive, magnificent photographs that lead you towards the film, which stars Hunger Games star Elizabeth Banks and surrounds the viewer from three sides.

 Face in the Crowd

Alex Prager, Poster for Face in the Crowd, 2013. Courtesy of the artist, Lehmann Maupin, New York and Hong Kong, Yancey Richardson Gallery, New York and M+B Gallery, Los Angeles.

“Alex Prager is pushing the boundaries of both film and photography with her new series “Face in the Crowd,” which features large-scale photographs and an immersive, three-channel video installation. Created simultaneously, the photographs and film work together and inform each other in innovative and exciting ways. By design, the viewer becomes part of the “crowd” but also learns the personal, revealing, at times humorous stories of the characters depicted in the photographs.” -Kaitlin Booher, Assistant Curator of Photography and Media Arts at the Corcoran Gallery of Art

 

 Face in the Crowd

Alex Prager, Crowd #1 (Stan Douglas), 2010. 5. Archival pigment print, 48 x 81 inches. Courtesy of the artist, Lehmann Maupin, New York and Hong Kong, Yancey Richardson Gallery, New York and M+B Gallery, Los Angeles.

Prager has been creating imagery in this style for a decade. She stages melodramatic dream worlds in front of her lens that are inspired by classic Hollywood, post-war America, fashion advertising, burlesque, and documentary photography icons.

 

 Face in the Crowd

Alex Prager, Crowd #2 (Emma), 2012. Archival 6. pigment print, 59 x 80.7 inches. Courtesy of the artist, Lehmann Maupin, New York and Hong Kong, Yancey Richardson Gallery, New York and M+B Gallery, Los Angeles.

According to the Corcoran Gallery of Art, “Face in the Crowd” is Prager’s most ambitious and complex series to date. It features large-scale photographs of people assembled in congested public spaces. Prager is at home in the grey area between fiction and reality. For “Face in the Crowd” she directed hundreds of actors in costumes within specially constructed sets.

 

 Face in the Crowd

Alex Prager, Crowd #3 (Pelican Beach), 2013. 7. Archival pigment print, 59.5 x 92.83 inches. Courtesy of the artist, Lehmann Maupin, New York and Hong Kong, Yancey Richardson Gallery, New York and M+B Gallery, Los Angeles.

Prager doesn’t overlook any details, no matter how small. Her use of color is carefully thought out and vividly resembles technicolor. The same can be said for her poignant films. Prager states that “Crowds have always been an interest of mine. It may look like a sea of people, but there are so many interesting stories, all colliding silently.”

 

 Face in the Crowd

Alex Prager, Crowd #4 (New Haven), 2013. Archival pigment print, 59.5 x 75 inches. Courtesy of the artist, Lehmann Maupin, New York and Hong Kong, Yancey Richardson Gallery, New York and M+B Gallery, Los Angeles.

The scenes in Prager’s work “enact psychological narratives of private and public revelation, repulsion, fear, personal safety, and the desire for basic human interaction.”

 

 Face in the Crowd

Alex Prager, Crowd #5 (Washington Square West), 2013. Archival pigment print, 59.5 x 72 inches. Courtesy of the artist, Lehmann Maupin, New York and Hong Kong, Yancey Richardson Gallery, New York and M+B Gallery, Los Angeles.

Prager is “fascinated by the experience of being involved in other people’s lives accidentally” which is often unavoidable in busy cities such as New York and London, in which Prager has spent time.

 

 Face in the Crowd

Alex Prager, 3:14 pm, Pacific Ocean and Eye #9 (Passenger Casualties), 2012. Two archival pigment prints, 59 x 55.4 inches and 20 x 23 inches. Courtesy of the artist, Lehmann Maupin, New York and Hong Kong, Yancey Richardson Gallery, New York and M+B Gallery, Los Angeles.

Alongside Prager’s work from the series “Face in the Crowd,” the exhibition features a vast selection of earlier photographs and films. Another influence of hers is clearly the popular children’s book “Where’s Waldo?” The dark humor in her work has been influenced by Roy Andersson’s film “Songs from the Second Floor.”

 

 Face in the Crowd

Alex Prager, Despair Film Still #4, 2010. Archival pigment print, 16 x 20 inches. Courtesy of the artist, Lehmann Maupin, New York and Hong Kong, Yancey Richardson Gallery, New York and M+B Gallery, Los Angeles.

The film, staring Elizabeth Banks, and photographs for “Face in the Crowd” uphold a dynamic portrait of the individual within the complexity of the larger crowd.

 

The above video gives an inside look at the “Face in the Crowd” exhibit at the Corcoran Gallery of Art. “Face in the Crowd” is also on display at Lemann Maupin Gallery in Chelsea, New York until Feb. 22, 2014.

For more featured photography curated by ABC News’ photo editors, and at Picture This, the ABC News photography blog.

 

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Photog Connects Mermaids to Real World http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/headlines/2014/01/photog-connects-mermaids-to-real-world/ http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/headlines/2014/01/photog-connects-mermaids-to-real-world/#comments Tue, 14 Jan 2014 20:08:08 +0000 Kate Bubacz http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/headlines/?p=505996 Artist Hana Vojackova describes her project, “Milk & Sea” as “a photographic exploration of how to connect these mythical females to the real world.”

With this idea in mind, Vojackova asks the question, “what could mermaids’ stories be if the mermaids were living now in contemporary conditions? Where would they live? What would they do? Who would they actually be?”

Vojackova traveled to several different countries, she says, “looking for inspiration and stories, and looking for local girls who felt a bit different or special. Influenced by the places, the cultures and the girls’ real lives, I created narratives that I then staged for the tableau photographs.”

 

ht mermaid germany kb 140109 blog Photog Connects Mermaids to Real WorldJaymy, Germany

 

ht mermaid portugal kb 140109 blog Photog Connects Mermaids to Real WorldSolana, Portugal

 

ht mermaid sicily kb 140109 blog Photog Connects Mermaids to Real WorldLaura, Sicily

 

ht mermaids iceland kb 140109 blog Photog Connects Mermaids to Real WorldIda, Iceland

 

ht mermaid england kb 140109 blog Photog Connects Mermaids to Real WorldLisa, England

 Photog Connects Mermaids to Real WorldBarunka, Czech Republic

To see more of Hana Vojackova’s work, please visit her website here.

For more featured photography curated by ABC News’ photo editors, and at Picture This, the ABC News photography blog.

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Photo-Bombing Birds and Bugs http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/headlines/2014/01/photo-bombing-birds-and-bugs/ http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/headlines/2014/01/photo-bombing-birds-and-bugs/#comments Thu, 09 Jan 2014 19:15:33 +0000 Sarah Kobos http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/headlines/?p=505625 Kurt Caviezel is a Swiss photographer who lives and works in Zurich, Switzerland. Caviezel takes photographs around the world via publicly accessible webcams. To capture the images from his “Animals” series, he has to be in the right place (or looking at the right webcam) at the right time.

HT kurt caviezel webcam 14 sk 140101 blog Photo Bombing Birds and Bugs

Caviezel’s interest in this method was first sparked when he published a book titled “Red Light” in 2000. The photographs in the book feature car drivers waiting for the light to turn green. He photographed these subjects at a busy intersection in Zurich, Switzerland using a 1000mm telephoto lens.

 Photo Bombing Birds and Bugs

Caviezel became interested in continuing this project in other cities, within other cultures, wondering if he would recognize other “waiting-acts.” He started to plan his voyages and then was made aware of traffic-cams in the U.S. From there he began researching publicly accessible webcams around the world. Caviezel was, and still is, fascinated by the authenticity of webcam images.

 Photo Bombing Birds and Bugs

Caviezel says you can basically group publicly available webcams into two categories: ones that gaze at public places and ones that demonstrate private places. Caviezel gathers from both categories and have archived around 3 million images over the course of 14 years, and takes new photos every day. He has around 10,000 publicly accessible webcams bookmarked.

 Photo Bombing Birds and Bugs

Because public webcams stay in the same spot for many years, there is no conventional active photographer who selects the image with his viewfinder.

 Photo Bombing Birds and Bugs

This is unknown territory in the history of traditional photography- suddenly a camera has a thousand eyes instead of one. The screen assumes the role of the viewfinder, the mouse operates as the trigger, and the webcam becomes the optical device.

 Photo Bombing Birds and Bugs

Caviezel likes to compare these images with Rorschach-test: You can see it as something ominous, or you can be amused.

HT kurt caviezel webcam 15 sk 140101 blog Photo Bombing Birds and Bugs

What makes Caviezel interested in these photo-bomb-esque images because when an element suddenly looms in front of the camera, they seem to form another “world,” which changes the context of the image completely.

 Photo Bombing Birds and Bugs

All images courtesy of Kurt Caviezel. Caviezel’s responses have been edited and condensed for clarity and length.

For more featured photography curated by ABC News’ photo editors, and at Picture This, the ABC News photography blog.

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