Comments on: Dr. Oz’s Advice: Brush Your Teeth to Prevent a Heart Attack http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/health/2011/09/12/dr-ozs-advice-brush-your-teeth-to-prevent-a-heart-attack/ The latest Health news and blog posts from ABC News contributors and bloggers. Wed, 16 Apr 2014 20:26:36 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.2.1 By: Mckinley Jespersen http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/health/2011/09/12/dr-ozs-advice-brush-your-teeth-to-prevent-a-heart-attack/#comment-1704051 Mckinley Jespersen Wed, 11 Jul 2012 00:10:47 +0000 http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/health/?p=3341#comment-1704051 I agree in order to keep your teeth health we must brush our teeth after each meal when possible. This starts at early age in order to create a habit and have I agree in order to keep your teeth health we must brush our teeth after each meal when possible. This starts at early age in order to create a habit and have

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By: Cat Salvatori http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/health/2011/09/12/dr-ozs-advice-brush-your-teeth-to-prevent-a-heart-attack/#comment-95871 Cat Salvatori Wed, 21 Sep 2011 12:42:50 +0000 http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/health/?p=3341#comment-95871 We strongly encourage all of our parents of young patients to water down their childrens' juice and not to allow them to sip on their drinks all the time. If they have a straw even better. We strongly encourage all of our parents of young patients to water down their childrens’ juice and not to allow them to sip on their drinks all the time. If they have a straw even better.

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By: Gregori M. Kurtzman, DDS, MAGD, FPFA, FADI, DICOI, DADIA http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/health/2011/09/12/dr-ozs-advice-brush-your-teeth-to-prevent-a-heart-attack/#comment-64271 Gregori M. Kurtzman, DDS, MAGD, FPFA, FADI, DICOI, DADIA Fri, 16 Sep 2011 19:27:07 +0000 http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/health/?p=3341#comment-64271 Gum disease has long been ignored and the total body effects of the bacteria in the mouth can have on general health. In the past decade increasing evidence has been published in the medical and dental literature from multiple sources showing the relationship behind whats occurring in the mouth and cardiovascular disease, respiratory disease, stroke, diabetes complications and other areas of health. But gum disease (periodontal disease) is a hidden killer. We can not visually see bacteria so most ignore the signs that something is amiss. Bleeding in the mouth is NEVER a sign of health but most patients accept bleeding when they brush their teeth. Would those same patient accept bleeding each time they were to brush or comb their hair? No. Healthy tissue does not bleed and bleeding is always an indicator that something is going on and should be addressed. There are good bacteria and bad bacteria and the key is changing the environment to favor those beneficial bacteria and eliminate the bad bacteria. Bad bacterial produce toxins that lead the body to develop an inflammatory reaction and this is what causes issues distant from the mouth. Increasing research is also focusing in on spirochetes as one of the nastier bugs causing issues. We have to think of the tissue which includes the mouth like a checker board, only one thing can sit on each square. This can be bacteria, yeast or other micro critters. In a healthy system the squares are filled with good bacteria. When health is affected the bacterial balance shifts and now bad bacteria can sit on the square or in some individuals especially the older patients yeast can fill the squares. So how do we create and maintain an good environment? Good home care (brushing and flossing) is very important as well as regular visits to the dentist. its always better to catch problems when they are small as they have caused less problems in the mouth and elsewhere in the body and early intervention is always less costly then ignoring the problem till it becomes critical. As said, gum disease is a silent killer and most patients are unaware of what is going on until its late in the process. With regard to dental insurance we do have to look at this as discount plans and its understandable that with the current economy patients are avoiding undue expenses but spending a little now with regular checkups and professional cleanings is always more cost effective then ignoring problems. Especially today with the clear links to general health showing ignoring ones dental health and gums will effect more then what teeth you keep. Gum disease has long been ignored and the total body effects of the bacteria in the mouth can have on general health. In the past decade increasing evidence has been published in the medical and dental literature from multiple sources showing the relationship behind whats occurring in the mouth and cardiovascular disease, respiratory disease, stroke, diabetes complications and other areas of health. But gum disease (periodontal disease) is a hidden killer. We can not visually see bacteria so most ignore the signs that something is amiss. Bleeding in the mouth is NEVER a sign of health but most patients accept bleeding when they brush their teeth. Would those same patient accept bleeding each time they were to brush or comb their hair? No. Healthy tissue does not bleed and bleeding is always an indicator that something is going on and should be addressed. There are good bacteria and bad bacteria and the key is changing the environment to favor those beneficial bacteria and eliminate the bad bacteria. Bad bacterial produce toxins that lead the body to develop an inflammatory reaction and this is what causes issues distant from the mouth. Increasing research is also focusing in on spirochetes as one of the nastier bugs causing issues. We have to think of the tissue which includes the mouth like a checker board, only one thing can sit on each square. This can be bacteria, yeast or other micro critters. In a healthy system the squares are filled with good bacteria. When health is affected the bacterial balance shifts and now bad bacteria can sit on the square or in some individuals especially the older patients yeast can fill the squares. So how do we create and maintain an good environment? Good home care (brushing and flossing) is very important as well as regular visits to the dentist. its always better to catch problems when they are small as they have caused less problems in the mouth and elsewhere in the body and early intervention is always less costly then ignoring the problem till it becomes critical. As said, gum disease is a silent killer and most patients are unaware of what is going on until its late in the process. With regard to dental insurance we do have to look at this as discount plans and its understandable that with the current economy patients are avoiding undue expenses but spending a little now with regular checkups and professional cleanings is always more cost effective then ignoring problems. Especially today with the clear links to general health showing ignoring ones dental health and gums will effect more then what teeth you keep.

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By: Jamie Amir http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/health/2011/09/12/dr-ozs-advice-brush-your-teeth-to-prevent-a-heart-attack/#comment-58401 Jamie Amir Wed, 14 Sep 2011 18:18:51 +0000 http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/health/?p=3341#comment-58401 Hi there, my name is Jamie Amir, and I am a periodontist based in Ocala, FL. I think the reason Dr. Oz says to wait 30 minutes after a meal is because enamel affected by acid will remineralize from ions present in the saliva; if you brush straight away, you are not giving the enamel an opportunity for this to happen. He is spot on about triclosan and sodium lauryl sulfate. I am actually really surprised to hear anybody mention this. The previous comment that doubted the correlation is partially right, there is no doubt that was causes gum disease makes it more likely to have a stroke and have heart disease; namely a diet high in refined carbohydrates, soda being the #1 culprit. No, saturated fat is NOT the problem, it is our addiction to all things sweet and junky! However, there is some evidence that shows that bacteria may get into the blood stream through leaky blood vessels in inflamed gum tissue. In my opinion, it is a combination of these 2 factors that links periodontal disease to heart disease. I simply do not see periodontal disease in people who eat a healthy diet. I have successfully treated many patients with periodontal disease, but the ones who have the most substantial improvements are the ones who take on my dietary recommendations. My recommendations for every patient are: 1) Eliminate all sugary drinks from your diet 2) reduce packaged/processed foods 3) increase whole foods (foods from the ground!) Whether or not people listen to me varies considerably, but I am proud to say I have many patients walking around who have managed to substantially improve their diets. As far as when to brush, brushing before eating is better, (remove the bacteria first, acid attacks from plaque occur within 30 seconds after a meal) but brushing alone is simply not enough as most periodontal (gum) disease actually occurs right between the teeth where the toothbrush doesn't get. I recommend interproximal brushes (Dentek go-betweens or GUM brand interdental brushes) and flossing daily. Yes, expecting somebody to brush before and after meals is unrealistic, but if people catch a lot of food between their teeth, those little inbetween brushes (they look like tiny bottle brushes) work very efficiently to get the chunks of food out. I personally use one as often as possible, I keep them in the car, home and office. Hi there, my name is Jamie Amir, and I am a periodontist based in Ocala, FL. I think the reason Dr. Oz says to wait 30 minutes after a meal is because enamel affected by acid will remineralize from ions present in the saliva; if you brush straight away, you are not giving the enamel an opportunity for this to happen.
He is spot on about triclosan and sodium lauryl sulfate. I am actually really surprised to hear anybody mention this.
The previous comment that doubted the correlation is partially right, there is no doubt that was causes gum disease makes it more likely to have a stroke and have heart disease; namely a diet high in refined carbohydrates, soda being the #1 culprit. No, saturated fat is NOT the problem, it is our addiction to all things sweet and junky!
However, there is some evidence that shows that bacteria may get into the blood stream through leaky blood vessels in inflamed gum tissue. In my opinion, it is a combination of these 2 factors that links periodontal disease to heart disease. I simply do not see periodontal disease in people who eat a healthy diet. I have successfully treated many patients with periodontal disease, but the ones who have the most substantial improvements are the ones who take on my dietary recommendations. My recommendations for every patient are: 1) Eliminate all sugary drinks from your diet 2) reduce packaged/processed foods 3) increase whole foods (foods from the ground!) Whether or not people listen to me varies considerably, but I am proud to say I have many patients walking around who have managed to substantially improve their diets.
As far as when to brush, brushing before eating is better, (remove the bacteria first, acid attacks from plaque occur within 30 seconds after a meal) but brushing alone is simply not enough as most periodontal (gum) disease actually occurs right between the teeth where the toothbrush doesn’t get. I recommend interproximal brushes (Dentek go-betweens or GUM brand interdental brushes) and flossing daily. Yes, expecting somebody to brush before and after meals is unrealistic, but if people catch a lot of food between their teeth, those little inbetween brushes (they look like tiny bottle brushes) work very efficiently to get the chunks of food out. I personally use one as often as possible, I keep them in the car, home and office.

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By: nyscof http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/health/2011/09/12/dr-ozs-advice-brush-your-teeth-to-prevent-a-heart-attack/#comment-49461 nyscof Mon, 12 Sep 2011 19:10:47 +0000 http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/health/?p=3341#comment-49461 I doubt this correlation is correct. Probably what causes heart disease also causes tooth decay. Since Dr. Oz oddly doesn't recommend ingestion of tooth essential nutrients such as calcium, phosphorus, Vitamins A, C, D, and he touts the drug fluoride instead, we can no longer put faith in his over-the-top self-confident espousal of what he believes. Modern science indicates that ingesting fluoride (which does occur upon brushing) does not reduce tooth decay but does contribute to adverse health effects. Fluoride drugs are added to NYC's water supplies in a failed effort to reduce tooth decay costing approximately $24 yearly. If you agree this should stop, please sign the petition to Mayor Bloomberg here: I doubt this correlation is correct. Probably what causes heart disease also causes tooth decay. Since Dr. Oz oddly doesn’t recommend ingestion of tooth essential nutrients such as calcium, phosphorus, Vitamins A, C, D, and he touts the drug fluoride instead, we can no longer put faith in his over-the-top self-confident espousal of what he believes.

Modern science indicates that ingesting fluoride (which does occur upon brushing) does not reduce tooth decay but does contribute to adverse health effects. Fluoride drugs are added to NYC’s water supplies in a failed effort to reduce tooth decay costing approximately $24 yearly. If you agree this should stop, please sign the petition to Mayor Bloomberg here:

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By: Bill http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/health/2011/09/12/dr-ozs-advice-brush-your-teeth-to-prevent-a-heart-attack/#comment-49401 Bill Mon, 12 Sep 2011 18:56:18 +0000 http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/health/?p=3341#comment-49401 Does Dorthy agree with OZ? Does Dorthy agree with OZ?

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By: DeAnn Gradert R.D.H. http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/health/2011/09/12/dr-ozs-advice-brush-your-teeth-to-prevent-a-heart-attack/#comment-49331 DeAnn Gradert R.D.H. Mon, 12 Sep 2011 18:11:19 +0000 http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/health/?p=3341#comment-49331 I have been a registered dental hygienist for 30+ yrs and have been working as such all of those years and I wish Dr. Oz would stick to medicine and have a dental professional on these types of shows to give actual dental advice to the masses I appreciate the fact that he reaches a lot of people with his tv show and weekly column in the newspaper, but he is seriously misinforming people. The idea that brushing before breakfast because brushing after is somehow damaging to enamel is ridiculous. The idea of waiting 30 minutes after eating before brushing is odd. The damage to teeth from having breakfast residue hanging around all day is FAR more extensive. Realistically, to think that people will brush before breakfast AND 30 minutes after is absurd!! Some people ONLY brush once a day (hard to believe, but true) and if that is BEFORE breakfast and not again until the next morning before breakfast leaves a WHOLE day"s worth of food debris in the mouth for the normal oral flora (bacteria) to digest and convert into decay-causing, periodontal disease-causing acid for a full 24hrs straight! That is a bombed-out mouth waiting to happen. I take blood pressures on all of my patients every time I see them, but I am not going to get on television and advise the general public on how to manage their blood pressure....that's not my area of expertise. Also, on the subject of Dr. Oz's weekly column from several months back advising the general public not to have any dental x-rays unless one is having pain or problems is SO irresponsible.....does that mean that women should not have mammograms unless they feel a large lump in their breast or have other symptoms consistent with breast cancer?? I would be willing to discuss any of these topics with Dr. Oz if he would want to contact me. P.S.: The heart disease / gum disease connection is not that new. I have an article published in "The Journal of Periodontology" from 1998 documenting this information. Thank you for your time. I have been a registered dental hygienist for 30+ yrs and have been working as such all of those years and I wish Dr. Oz would stick to medicine and have a dental professional on these types of shows to give actual dental advice to the masses I appreciate the fact that he reaches a lot of people with his tv show and weekly column in the newspaper, but he is seriously misinforming people. The idea that brushing before breakfast because brushing after is somehow damaging to enamel is ridiculous. The idea of waiting 30 minutes after eating before brushing is odd. The damage to teeth from having breakfast residue hanging around all day is FAR more extensive. Realistically, to think that people will brush before breakfast AND 30 minutes after is absurd!! Some people ONLY brush once a day (hard to believe, but true) and if that is BEFORE breakfast and not again until the next morning before breakfast leaves a WHOLE day”s worth of food debris in the mouth for the normal oral flora (bacteria) to digest and convert into decay-causing, periodontal disease-causing acid for a full 24hrs straight! That is a bombed-out mouth waiting to happen. I take blood pressures on all of my patients every time I see them, but I am not going to get on television and advise the general public on how to manage their blood pressure….that’s not my area of expertise. Also, on the subject of Dr. Oz’s weekly column from several months back advising the general public not to have any dental x-rays unless one is having pain or problems is SO irresponsible…..does that mean that women should not have mammograms unless they feel a large lump in their breast or have other symptoms consistent with breast cancer?? I would be willing to discuss any of these topics with Dr. Oz if he would want to contact me. P.S.: The heart disease / gum disease connection is not that new. I have an article published in “The Journal of Periodontology” from 1998 documenting this information. Thank you for your time.

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By: Vivian Brown http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/health/2011/09/12/dr-ozs-advice-brush-your-teeth-to-prevent-a-heart-attack/#comment-49161 Vivian Brown Mon, 12 Sep 2011 16:56:03 +0000 http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/health/?p=3341#comment-49161 I'm having problems finding the link for the Dr. Oz contest. I’m having problems finding the link for the Dr. Oz contest.

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By: Stephanie http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/health/2011/09/12/dr-ozs-advice-brush-your-teeth-to-prevent-a-heart-attack/#comment-49021 Stephanie Mon, 12 Sep 2011 15:51:19 +0000 http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/health/?p=3341#comment-49021 Given that there's a proven connection between oral health and overall health, do you think it's time for dental insurance reform? Currently, most dental plans are basically a discount plan and don't cover or barely cover anything that's not 'routine.' What would it take to get oral health care covered by medical insurance? Given that there’s a proven connection between oral health and overall health, do you think it’s time for dental insurance reform? Currently, most dental plans are basically a discount plan and don’t cover or barely cover anything that’s not ‘routine.’ What would it take to get oral health care covered by medical insurance?

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By: kart http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/health/2011/09/12/dr-ozs-advice-brush-your-teeth-to-prevent-a-heart-attack/#comment-48921 kart Mon, 12 Sep 2011 15:24:41 +0000 http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/health/?p=3341#comment-48921 Of all the foods/drinks we consume.........SOFT DRINKS AND SUGARY DRINKS ARE THE WORST FOR OUR TEETH Of all the foods/drinks we consume………SOFT DRINKS AND SUGARY DRINKS ARE THE WORST FOR OUR TEETH

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