Double Stuf Oreos Not All They’re Stuffed Up to Be?

By ABC News

Aug 19, 2013 9:25pm
GTY oreo ml 130819 16x9 608 Double Stuf Oreos Not All Theyre Stuffed Up to Be?

                                                               (Image Credit: Getty)

If you ever thought high school math wasn’t useful in real life, take a look at what the students in Dan Anderson’s class discovered.

The upstate New York high school teacher tasked the students in his “Consumer Math” course in the spring with determining whether Nabisco’s Double Stuf and Mega Stuf Oreos really are, indeed, double and mega stuffed.

“This class is for students struggling with math so I’m always looking for hands-on activities,” Anderson, who teaches in Queensbury, N.Y., told ABCNews.com today.  “When the Mega Stuf Oreos came out, I decided to do it.”

Anderson, 32, brought his class one package each of regular Oreos, Double Stuf and Mega Stuf.  He then split his students into different groups, with some measuring the cookies’ height and some their weight.

“We weighed 10 of each – Double Stuf, Mega Stuf and regular,” Anderson said.  “And we weighed five wafers alone to deduct from the total.”

Using mathematical equations to determine the creme content of the cookies, Anderson’s students found that the bigger Oreos might disappoint.

The Double Stuf Oreos were 1.86 times the size of regular Oreos, while the Mega Oreos were 2.68 times the size of regular Oreos, by the students’ measure.

“They were surprised,” said Anderson, who documented the classroom experiment on his blog.

A spokeswoman for Nabisco told ABCNews.com the company’s Double Stuf Oreos are made to have double the creme filling as the original Oreos.

“While I’m not familiar with what was done in the classroom setting, I can confirm for you that our recipe for the Oreo Double Stuf Cookie has double the Stuf, or creme filling, when compared with our base, or original Oreo cookie,” the spokeswoman said.

Anderson’s students’ discovery comes on the heels of online outrage directed at Subway Australia earlier this year when a customer posted a photo on Facebook of his foot-long sub next to a tape measure to prove it fell an inch short.

Subway responded by saying the footlong was a “descriptive name for the sub sold in Subway Restaurants and not intended to be a measurement of length.”

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