Jhpiego Receives $24.9 Million from USAID: Continuing to Save Lives Worldwide

By Mandana Mofidi

Oct 21, 2011 9:58pm

Jhpiego, a leading non-governmental organization in maternal and child health, was awarded $24.9 million to develop low-cost, life-saving technologies for some of the biggest health care challenges in the world.  The funding for the “Accelovate” project comes from the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID).

“This is an exciting new venture that builds on the breadth of Jhpiego’s technical expertise and practical experience in bringing low-cost innovative health care solutions to countries to prevent the needless deaths of women and families,” said Leslie Mancuso, Jhpiego’s President and CEO, in a statement.

The five-year project aims to create and implement simple, cost-effective devices and solutions in the developing world to help the lives of the most vulnerable people.  As an affiliate of John Hopkins University (JHU), Jhpiego will combine forces with Hopkins’ engineering and medical departments in a collaborative effort to develop technologies that can be used on the ground.

Earlier this year, ABC News launched a Maternal Health Challenge for university students to share their big ideas and emerging innovations in maternal health care.  Three graduate students from John Hopkins School of Engineering in partnership with Jhpiego were selected as the winning team for their revolutionary design: a pen-size device that can help screen pregnant women and newborns in developing countries for potentially life-threatening conditions such as gestational diabetes and anemia. Each test costs less than a cent.

Watch here are ABC News Chief Health and Medical Editor Dr. Richard Besser notifies the winners here in May:

The recent $24.9 in funding will help Jhpiego continue to fund this type of technology and innovative design while scaling up access to their existing technologies to front-line health workers on the ground.

Take Action:  For more information visit www.jhpiego.org

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