Clinton Sharpens Attacks; Drives a New Message

By Lee Speigel

May 3, 2008 2:18pm

ABC News’ Eloise Harper reports: Sen. Hillary Clinton, D-N.Y., sharpened her attacks on her opponent three days before the critical primaries on Tuesday. Clinton offered a new message: "Headlines and Trend Lines" -– a slogan she has used before, but really hammered on Saturday in Wake Forrest, N.C.

In her sharpest remarks in days, Clinton said she is better on the housing crisis, health care and on the gas problem than Sen. Barack Obama, D-Ill.

Clinton addressed the gas tax issue saying, “There’s a big disagreement in this campaign. You’ll see it in the headlines about where Sen. Obama and I stand on taking on the immediate crisis we confront.

“You’ve probably heard the debate about the gas tax, because my opponent is running ads and holding press conferences attacking my plan to try to give you some kind of break this summer.” Clinton explained her plan and why it was better, hitting on the gas tax holiday and other solutions she has proposed.

Clinton also pointed out the difference between her policy on housing versus Obama’s. “When I said we needed to take action to freeze foreclosures to protect people from losing their homes my opponent disagreed.”

Clinton then turned to her health care jab, one she has pointed out from state to state. “My opponent’s plan would leave out 15 million people. That’s not really going to work. Because what that means is the uninsured will still go to the emergency room.”

Clinton closed, saying, “I think if you are a leader, you have got to look at both the headlines and the trend lines. … This issue that we are facing today over gas prices, and the debate that my opponent and I are having over it, is really part of a larger difference between us. It’s something I hope you will think about when you go to vote -– either voting early today or voting next Tuesday.”

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