Muted Clinton Preaches Unity, Claims Indiana Victory

By Ed O'Keefe

May 6, 2008 11:40pm

ABC News’ Kate Snow and Eloise Harper Report: Flanked by her husband and daughter, Hillary Clinton thanked Indiana voters for their support Tuesday and pledged to continue on to West Virginia, Oregon, Kentucky and beyond.

But she was not the relentlessly upbeat Clinton of victory’s past. And in contrast to other primary night parties, Bill Clinton stood unsmiling behind her for much of the speech.

Sen. Clinton, D-N.Y., again asked voters to continue to support her financially, dropping the name of her website.

"Tonight, once again, I need your help to continue our journey," she said.

Clinton pledged to "never stop fighting for you" but faced with a decisive Obama victory in North Carolina and uncertain results in Indiana, she also seemed to concede the possibility that she might not become the eventual nominee.

"People are watching this race and they’re wondering . . . I win, he wins, I win, he wins . . . it’s so close. That says a lot about how passionate our supporters are . . . but I can assure you that no matter what happens I will work for the nominee of the Democratic party," she said.

On Wednesday, Clinton will hold meetings in Washington with undecided superdelegates. The campaign says those meetings were scheduled several days ago. But at this critical juncture, they could prove pivotal.

Clinton called the campaign thus far a "journey" that "has been a blessing to me". 

And now, she said, it’s "on to West Virginia, Kentucky, Oregon and other states where people are eager to have their voices heard."

"I’m going to work my heart out in West Virginia and Kentucky this month and I intend to win them in November," Clinton said.

Again, she suggested that even if she were not the nominee, the Democrat on the ticket would be best for the White House.

"I want the people in these upcoming states to know we’re going to work hard to reach out to all of you.  Because we want you to know the Democratic party is your party and a Democratic president would be best for you," Clinton said.

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