Hillary Clinton Questions Dick Cheney’s Credibility

By Lindsey Ellerson

Apr 22, 2009 11:10am

ABC News’ David Chalian Reports:  Hillary Clinton stepped directly into the middle of this week’s political fray when she questioned former Vice President Dick Cheney’s credibility on the torture memos recently released by the Obama administration. Congressman Dana Rohrbacher, R-Calif., took up Dick Cheney’s cause today and pressed Secretary of State Clinton to urge the Obama administration to declassify and release documents he believes demonstrate the success of the enhanced interrogation techniques employed during the Bush administration.  Rep. Rohrbacher referred to Mr. Cheney’s recent comments where he claimed the memos released by the Obama administration last week tend to only show the work of CIA interrogators and Justice Department officials in a negative light.  The congressman went on to say that Mr. Cheney believes specific documents that are still classified will show that information gleaned from those interrogations aided the national security interests of the United States. "Are you in favor of releasing the documents that Dick Cheney has been requesting be released?," asked Rep. Rohrbacher. "Well, it won’t surprise you, I don’t consider him a particularly reliable source of information," responded Secretary Clinton to a smattering of laughter in the hearing room. Congressman Rohrbacher appeared none too pleased and went at it again.  "Madam Secretary, I asked you a specific question," he said sternly. "Congressman, I believe we ought to get to the bottom of this entire matter. I think it is in the best interest of our country and that is what the president believes and that is why he has taken the actions he did," said Clinton. Mrs. Clinton also refused to share with Mr. Rohrbacher the advice on this matter that she will provide to President Obama. When asked about Vice President Cheney’s public disapproval of the Obama administration’s actions over the torture memos, White House press secretary Robert Gibbs said it was a years old and fundamental policy disagreement. "We’ve had a at least two-year policy disagreement with the Vice President of the United States of America. That policy disagreement is whether or not you can uphold the values in which this country was founded at the same time that you protect the citizens that live in that country," said Gibbs.  "The President of the United States and this administration believes that you can. The Vice President has come to, in our opinion, a different conclusion."

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