Robert Gibbs Mocks Sarah Palin from White House Podium…When Imitation Isn’t Flattery

By Lindsey Ellerson

Feb 9, 2010 3:10pm

ABC News’ Karen Travers reports: It may not have been as dead-on accurate as the Saturday Night Live impression by Tina Fey, but today White House Press Secretary Robert Gibbs mocked former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin (R) for seeming to rely on crib notes for a speech last weekend. Answering a question about the Obama Administration’s stance on health care negotiations with Republicans, Gibbs stopped and looked at his left hand and said coyly, “Oh I wrote a few things down.” “I wrote ‘eggs, milk and bread,’” Gibbs said. “But I crossed out bread, just so I can make pancakes for [son] Ethan if it snows.  And then I wrote down “hope and change,” just in case I forgot.” Gibbs of course was referring to the heat that Palin took on the Internet this week for what appeared to be crib notes on her hand during her address to the Tea Party convention on Saturday night. Photographs show that written on Palin’s left palm were the words “energy, cut taxes and lift American spirits.” The word “budget” also was visible but was crossed out. Palin tried to play it off the following day while campaigning in Texas for Gov. Rick Perry (R) with another message on her hand – “Hi Mom.” Critics charged Palin with double standards after she poked fun at Obama Saturday for his frequent use of a teleprompter for speeches. “This is about the people,” Palin said Saturday, referring to the Tea Party convention. “This is about the people, and it’s bigger than any king or queen of a Tea Party. And it’s a lot bigger than any charismatic guy with a teleprompter.” In her address, Palin also questioned Obama’s progress after one year in office. “”Now a year later, I got to ask the supporters of all that, how is that hope-y, change-y stuff working out for you,” she said. -Karen Travers

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