Oily Birds in Political Ads

By Alex Pepper

Jun 14, 2010 4:30pm

ABC News' Z. Byron Wolf reports: Images of oil-soaked birds in the Gulf of Mexico have pervaded newspapers and TV news shows. Now, inevitably, they’re finding their way into political ads. Oil spill politics is starting to hit the airwaves.   The liberal group American United for Change crammed images of the oil gusher, oily birds, oily beaches and Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad into a thirty second ad, which they’ve spent $400,000 to target Republican Sen. Scott Brown, who is not up for reelection this year, and Sens. Richard Burr of North Carolina and Chuck Grassley of Iowa, who are. Watch the ad directed at Brown here. The ads point to political contributions from the oil and gas industry to the Senators and ties that efforts last week by Republicans in the Senate to strip the EPA of its ability to regulate greenhouse gases as sticking up for oil companies. Six Democrats voted with Republicans in favor of stripping the EPA of its authority, including Sen. Blanche Lincoln, D-Ark, who has gotten more money from the oil and gas industry than any other politician during the current election cycle, according to data compiled by the Center for Responsive Politics.
Another liberal group, Votevets.org, began in late May using imagery from the Gulf of Mexico to argue in favor of more aggressively transitioning to an economy that is not so dependent on oil. It features a Louisiana National Guardsman who ties US oil dependence to national security. “When I signed on for the National Guard, I did it to help protect America from our enemies, like in the Persian Gulf, not to clean up an oil company’s mess here in the Gulf of Mexico,” says Guardsman Evan Wolf, standing in what appears to be a marsh and holding up a clear plastic bag full of oily water. He goes on to say that “our dependence on oil is threatening our national security,” and directs viewers to call their Senators to ask for “more clean, American made power.”

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