Whistleblower Blasts Wikileaks: ‘Irresponsible’ to Publish Intelligence, Says It Enlisted Soldier as ‘Personal Shopper’ for Secrets

By Kate McCarthy

Jul 26, 2010 9:17am

The former hacker who turned in the soldier suspected of handing military secrets to Wikileaks had some harsh words for the organization on "GMA" this morning.

“Wikileaks has acted in a tremendously irresponsible fashion and…they took advantage of systems that were put into place for the purpose of intelligence sharing, for the purpose of making sure that all elements of national security both at home and abroad had access to the information they needed in order to do their job,” Adrian Lamo said.

Private Bradley Manning, under suspicion since May for leaking other intelligence, had previously contacted Lamo apparently telling Lamo that he gave a significant amount of classified information to Wikileaks.

Lamo said he turned Manning over to the Pentagon in an effort to keep the reports from becoming public. But considering the sheer volume of information that came to light yesterday, Lamo says Manning could not have acted alone.

“I do not believe that private manning had the technical expertise necessary to communicate this amount information to the outside world without being detected on his own,” he said. “And I don’t believe he operated without guidance, rather I think it’s more likely that he was a personal shopper for classified data for the Wikileaks apparatus.”

Lamo echoed the Obama administration’s claims that the leaked information could harm national security and put lives at risk.

“It has harmed what is most important to our intelligence community and that is our ability to trust the people we put out there to do critical and sensitive jobs,” Lamo told me.

“It’s almost inconceivable to me that this could not result in harm to both security and actual real life people because it is easy to hear ‘national security’ and think that it is a…buzz word but at the end of the day it is about people,” Lamo said.

New York Times reporter Eric Schmitt, who had early access to the reports via Wikileaks, insists the paper removed any sensitive information that could have jeopardized operations.

“We worked very closely in this case with the White House and in fact the white house praised us for our efforts and due diligence going through this” he told me on “GMA.”

The intelligence reports fills in missing details of the war in Afghanistan, from previously undisclosed heat-seeking missiles to perhaps the most significant allegation that Pakistan’s intelligence agency –supposedly an American ally — is actually working against the United States.

“I think the most striking revelation here is even more detail about the complicity, the apparent complicity of the Pakistani spy service, the ISI, with militant groups including the Afghan Taliban, that are coordinating attacks inside American and coalition forces,” Schmitt said.

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