The Note’s Must-Reads for Monday June 24, 2013

Jun 24, 2013 3:07am

The Note’s Must-Reads are a round-up of today’s political headlines and stories from ABC News and the top U.S. newspapers. Posted Monday through Friday right here at www.abcnews.com

Compiled by ABC News’ Carrie Halperin, Jayce Henderson, Amanda VanAllen, and Will Cantine

IMMIGRATION
ABC News’ Alyssa Giannirakis: “Rep. Joaquin Castro: Immigration Legislation Will Not Pass If Speaker Boehner Uses ‘Hastert Rule’” Below you can find some of the notable comments made Sunday on “This Week with George Stephanopoulos.” The foreign policy roundtable guests included ABC News Chief Global Affairs Correspondent Martha Raddatz, Council on Foreign Relations president Richard Haass, and co-founder of the Foreign Policy Initiative Dan Senor. The political powerhouse roundtable guests included Rep. Joaquín Castro, D-Texas; Rep. Mike Kelly, R-Penn., ABC News Chief Business and Economics Correspondent Rebecca Jarvis; former Lead Auto Adviser and Counselor to the Treasury Secretary Steven Rattner, now chair of Willett Advisors; and Amity Shlaes, director of The 4% Growth Project at The George W. Bush Institute. LINK

USA Today’s Susan Page: “Poll shows Americans conflicted over immigration debate” As the immigration debate heads into a crucial period on Capitol Hill, Americans have been convinced. By both sides. In a new USA TODAY/Pew Research Center Poll, three of four people agree with big arguments made by proponents of legislation that would allow millions of undocumented workers to stay in the United States legally: that deporting them isn’t realistic, that granting them legal status would boost the U.S. economy, that most are hardworking and deserve an opportunity to stay. LINK

The Boston Globe’s Noah Bierman: “English fluency surfaces as GOP immigration issueWithin two square blocks, residents of this small city next to Miami can buy groceries, play bingo, talk to their mail carrier, get liposuction surgery — and even renew their US passports — without hearing or speaking a syllable of English. A command of Spanish, in fact, is critical to civic life, more so than almost anywhere else in the United States. LINK

The Washington Times’ Stephen Dinan: “Senate border deal may clear way for bill, wave of illegal immigrants” The border security deal senators struck last week has cleared the way for the immigration bill to pass with the support of at least 11 Republicans who say the additional 20,000 Border Patrol agents and potentially 350 miles of new fencing make the bill palatable. The only problem, according to analysts on all sides of the issue, is that those steps are not likely to achieve much in the way of stemming another wave of illegal immigration. LINK

ENERGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT
The Wall Street Journal’s Keith Johnson and Peters Nichols: “Obama’s Climate Plans Face Yearlong Fight” When President Barack Obama lays out plans to tackle climate change in a speech Tuesday, including the first effort to curb greenhouse-gas emissions from existing power plants, he will unleash a yearslong battle that has little assurance of being resolved during his time in office. The president has called climate change a “legacy issue,” and his speech may head off a backlash from environmentalists should his administration approve the proposed Keystone XL oil pipeline from Canada. But the address is unlikely to blunt criticism of Mr. Obama’s approach from the left or the right. LINK

The Los Angeles Times’ Louis Sahagun: “DWP to build groundwater treatment plants on Superfund site” The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power plans to build the world’s largest groundwater treatment center over one of the largest Superfund pollution sites in the United States: the San Fernando Basin. Two plants costing a combined $600 million to $800 million will restore groundwater pumping of drinking water from scores of San Fernando Valley wells that the DWP began closing in the 1980s, the utility said.  LINK

SUPREME COURT
The New York Times’ Campbell Robertson: “States Reined In By 1965 Voting Act Await A Decision” There is little agreement on anything, even when it all started, but sometime in the last decade the Beaumont Independent School District became a battle zone. The last word, for now, will come this week, when the Supreme Court rules on the constitutionality of Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act. Passed in 1965 at the height of the civil rights movement and renewed and amended several times since, the section requires states, counties, cities, school boards, water districts and other jurisdictions where there has been a history of racial discrimination to submit any proposed voting changes to the Justice Department for approval, or “preclearance.” LINK

NSA SCANDAL
Politico’s Reid J. Epstein: “On Snowden’s Trip, No Good Options For Obama” Edward Snowden’s globe-trotting is the latest international headache for President Barack Obama, with no relief in sight. The former National Security Agency contractor who leaked classified documents about top secret electronic surveillance programs is in Russia and headed to Latin America — where options for bringing him back to the United States to face charges range from highly unlikely to virtually nonexistent. LINK

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