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Hillary Clinton Out of Political Life But Still in Public Eye
PHOTO: Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton bids farewell to State Department employees at the State Department in Washington, Feb. 1, 2103, before departing the State Department for the final time as secretary of state.

Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP Photo

Less than a week after Hillary Clinton stepped down from her position as Secretary of State - and, by her own account, began a break from political life - she is emerging on the Web in a very public way. Already two different official sites are being tied to her and what could be her return to politics in the future.

First there is www.HillaryClintonOffice.com.

Registered last week, the site features a picture of Clinton with her name and a button one can click to get in contact with her. There is also a space for scheduling and media requests. There was no immediate response to such a request from ABC.

Though it's unclear who is actually running the site, someone is reading it regularly, according to this section of the privacy notice:

"If you wish to unsubscribe from communications, please email info@hillaryclintonoffice.com. HillaryClintonOffice.com will regularly process these request (sic)."

Meanwhile, her husband, former President Bill Clinton, and daughter Chelsea are encouraging people to send Hillary online thank-you notes. A page featured on the Clinton Foundation website reads:

"Thank You, Hillary!

"As First Lady, U.S. Senator, and Secretary of State, she has dedicated herself to service, and to giving more people in more places the opportunities to live their dreams.

"We hope you'll send her a personal note of thanks.

Sincerely, Bill and Chelsea."

The site gives people space to write a personal note. Those leaving notes also must enter their email addresses, first and last names and ZIP codes for the letters to be processed.

Of course there would be nothing barring the people running these sites from using the email addresses and zip codes for fundraising requests for a future presidential bid. Should that happen. Say in 2016?

ABC's Katie Bosland contributed to this report.

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