Back in the Climate Game: Obama Will Lay Out Global-Warming Plan
PHOTO: President Barack Obama arrives for a dinner at the Orangerie at Schloss Charlottenburg palace, June 19, 2013, in Berlin.

Since the death of energy reform in Congress, climate change hasn't been a big topic of discussion in Washington.

But on Tuesday, President Obama will lay out a plan to reduce carbon emissions and prepare for global warming, the White House says.

Obama tweeted a video from the White House account this afternoon, including a YouTube video warning about climate change and announcing his speech on Tuesday at Georgetown University:

Tweets signed "-bo" are sent my Obama himself, the White House has said.

"We'll need all of us, as citizens, to do our part to preserve God's creation for future generations - our forests and waterways, our croplands and snow-capped peaks," Obama says in the video. "There's no single step that can reverse the effects of climate change. But when it comes to the world we leave our children, we owe it to them to do what we can."

Obama mentioned climate change in his most recent inaugural address, and he posed his upcoming Georgetown address as a renewed call to action.

The YouTube video includes footage of major storms - what appears to be a hurricane surge lapping against an Eastern U.S. coastline, and a plains thunderstorm - and Obama speaking directly to camera.

"This Tuesday, I'll lay out my vision for where I believe we need to go - a national plan to reduce carbon pollution, prepare our country for the impacts of climate change, and lead global efforts to fight it," Obama says in the video.

Here's the full text of Obama's remarks in the video, from a pool report:

In my inaugural address, I pledged that America would respond to the growing threat of climate change for the sake of our children and future generations.

This Tuesday, I'll lay out my vision for where I believe we need to go - a national plan to reduce carbon pollution, prepare our country for the impacts of climate change, and lead global efforts to fight it.

This is a serious challenge - but it's one uniquely suited to America's strengths.

We'll need scientists to design new fuels, and farmers to grow them.

We'll need engineers to devise new sources of energy, and businesses to make and sell them.

We'll need workers to build the foundation for a clean energy economy.

And we'll need all of us, as citizens, to do our part to preserve God's creation for future generations - our forests and waterways, our croplands and snow-capped peaks.

There's no single step that can reverse the effects of climate change. But when it comes to the world we leave our children, we owe it to them to do what we can.

So I hope you'll share this message with your friends. Because this a challenge that affects everyone - and we all have a stake in solving it together.

I hope to see you Tuesday. Thank you.

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