Tim Flach
  • More Than Human: Animal Portraits

    Tim Flach's photographic series, 'More Than Human,' aims to explore the relationship of human and non-human animals by conveying the raw emotion of each species. Two bonobos, Diatou, left, and Cheka are seen in an embrace. Bonobos use sex and intimate sexual contact in many social situations; from diffusing confrontations to sharing food.
    Tim Flach
  • More Than Human: Animal Portraits

    Snow-white tiger named Shankar poses for his portrait.
    Tim Flach
  • More Than Human: Animal Portraits

    Featherless chickens, like the one in this image, are bred for suggested use in developing countries, do in part to their tolerance of high temperatures.
    Tim Flach
  • More Than Human: Animal Portraits

    Here is an axolotl, a species native to freshwater. The adult axolotls retain childlike features throughout their lives.
    Tim Flach
  • More Than Human: Animal Portraits

    The fruit bat, also known as flying fox. Unlike most bat species, fruit bats don't use echolocation to hunt for their food.
    Tim Flach
  • More Than Human: Animal Portraits

    An African bullfrog named Barney enjoys the flavor of another frog.
    Tim Flach
  • More Than Human: Animal Portraits

    Giant pandas, Ya Yun, left, and Ji Li, right.
    Tim Flach
  • More Than Human: Animal Portraits

    Rupee, the white-faced capuchin monkey appears to be counting. A clinical study by Professor Keith Chen found that capuchin monkeys can understand the concept of the exchange.
    Tim Flach
  • More Than Human: Animal Portraits

    Tai, like most Indian elephants, is very fond of water.
    Tim Flach
  • More Than Human: Animal Portraits

    The Western lowland gorilla named Djala glares at the camera. Djala lives in a breeding program in Port Lympne, England with his six "wives," three daughters and two sons.
    Tim Flach
  • More Than Human: Animal Portraits

    A common chimpanzee named Jambo turns his back to the camera. Jambo suffers from total alopecia, a medical condition in which hair is lost from some or all areas of the body.
    Tim Flach
  • More Than Human: Animal Portraits

    Bornean orangutans, Hanuman, Apsara and Rishi embrace and hold one another.
    Tim Flach
  • More Than Human: Animal Portraits

    Grace the great gray owl stares down her prey.
    Tim Flach
  • More Than Human: Animal Portraits

    A southern three-banded armadillo's outer coating of the 'shell' is made of the protein Keratin, a key biological compound and component of human skin.
    Tim Flach
  • More Than Human: Animal Portraits

    White peafowl fans its ivory feathers.
    Tim Flach
  • More Than Human: Animal Portraits

    The common raven named Smeagol flies through the air.
    Tim Flach
  • More Than Human: Animal Portraits

    Kanja, a Bengal tiger, shakes loose water after a swim. Unlike most cats, tigers are excellent swimmers and are "at home" in the water.
    Tim Flach
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