The 10 Dumbest Risks People Take With Their Smartphones

4) Automatically connecting to any available WiFi connections.

Whether you are using your laptop, tablet or smartphone, switch off the feature that connects to nearby WiFi networks automatically. Otherwise, hackers with the right software can easily hack your phone, as security experts have warned us for more than a decade.

5) Leaving Bluetooth connections open.

Bluejacking, Bluesnarfing, Bluebugging. These are all words that describe a hacker exploiting the open Bluetooth connection on your phone. While this type of hack requires the intruder to be relatively close to you (less than 30 feet away), the intrusion can occur undetected in a busy airport, hotel lobby, restaurant, or at a conference.

6) Failing to properly purge data from old smartphones.

This is a very common mistake. Many people fail to remove sensitive, personal data from their smartphone before taking it out of service, donating it or selling it. Short of physically shredding your device (which is the only surefire way to delete all your data in an irretrievable manner). For a how-to guide, click here. Deleting data before getting rid of your phone is simple common sense.

7) Downloading "free" apps that aren't actually free.

Some Apps that call themselves "free" are actually little more than thinly-disguised data thieves. Downloading one gives the app complete access to your phone, which a fraudster can use to steal your credit card and bank account info. Such apps also can turn your phone into a launch pad from which scammers can attack other peoples' phones with SMS texts and Smishing scams. Be smart and discreet about what you download. Read reviews first, and make sure the apps you download come from reputable sources.

8) Storing sensitive data on phones.

Many people store passwords, pins, Social Security numbers, credit card or bank account information on smartphones. It may be a document created expressly for this purpose, or it could be an email they themselves from their computers. On a phone, emails and downloaded documents are especially easy for thieves to find and steal, especially if the phone is not password protected. Some people even label the document or email "passwords," making them especially easy prey for hackers and scammers. Make sure to delete all documents and emails containing sensitive information from your phone.

9) Failing to clear browser history.

Not clearing the browser history on your phone can be just as dangerous as staying logged into the website of your bank or your favorite store (see mistake #3). By retracing your steps, a phone thief can use your history to hijack your accounts, steal your money and wreck havoc. To learn how to delete your history on an iPhone, click here. Android users can click here.

10) No remote wiping software.

Various apps and services enable you to locate your phone, and also wipe its data clean, if it's lost or stolen. Tech-savvy hackers may be able to disengage these applications, but it's just one more layer of protection you can use to reduce your risks if you ever lose your phone. For more information on how to disable your phone remotely, read this story.

At the end of the day, it doesn't matter how many anti-identity theft laws we passed, or how vigorously those laws are enforced. The ultimate guardian of the consumer is the consumer herself. Your identity is your asset. It is up to you to vigorously defend and protect it. You can take major steps toward protecting yourself by avoiding these stupid smartphone tricks.

This work is the opinion of the columnist and in no way reflects the opinion of ABC News.

Adam Levin is chairman and cofounder of Credit.com and Identity Theft 911. His experience as former director of the New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs gives him unique insight into consumer privacy, legislation and financial advocacy. He is a nationally recognized expert on identity theft and credit.

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