San Francisco Plane Crash: Why Did It Come in So Slow?

ABC News analyst Steven Ganyard discusses the crash of Asiana flight 214.
1:11 | 07/09/13

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Transcript for San Francisco Plane Crash: Why Did It Come in So Slow?
airport. Let's get more from abc's aviation consultant. We now know the plane was going in very slowly. What's your theory on why? At 82 seconds, george, we know from yesterday, that the crew had the computer, flying both the airplane and the engines. At 82 seconds, they turned off the computers and were manually flying the airplane. So, it was almost as if you're driving down the road, you're going into exit and your take your foot off the accelerator. You continue to steer and you forgot to put your foot on the accelera accelerator. It wasn't until seven seconds later, that the plane was almost at stall seed, that they realized, we need to fire up. The engines was on automatic. It's happening even though there's four pilots onboard? Four pilots onboard. They had a check captain, one of the senior guys in the whole company. A very experienced pilot. There to keep an eye on. How is this going to change training? At least with asiana, they have to go back and look at the corporate culture. To make sure they're adhering to stanrds. And globally, all airmen will have to make sure they adhere to procedures and the way things ought to be done is clear. Can't just rely on the

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