Rising Cost of Caring for Alzheimer's

Photo: Long Goodbye:  Hundreds of families share stories, and gain strength, in the battle against one of lifes cruelest diseases

Hundreds of families gathered at a rally in Washington, D.C., Monday night, in honor of their common mission: to care for loved ones who are slipping ever deeper into the fog of Alzheimer's.

"With Alzheimer's, you go through a progression, a downhill turn, and you don't have the support," Diane Shelton, whose husband has Alzheimer's, said at the rally at the Lincoln Memorial.

With no cure for the disease, families are left to provide years of care as each joins in its own long goodbye.

"Every single change that happens precipitates a whole new round of grieving," said Barbara Barham of Anderson, N.C., whose mother suffers from Alzheimer's. "The first time0 the person doesn't remember your name. The first time they don't remember you're their daughter."

When it came time for Xuan Quach, 36, to address the crowd, people at the rally understood her pain all too well. Her fears and everyday worries had a captive audience.

"I never thought that one day I would have to speak on my mother's behalf because Alzheimer's has taken away so much of her memory," she said.

The Alzheimer's Association estimates that as many as 5.3 million Americans now suffer from this memory-robbing disease, and the number is growing steadily. According to their estimates, it costs the country around $148 billion a year to provide care.

In her hometown of Alameda, Calif., Xuan has had to change jobs and move in with her 62-year-old mother, who was diagnosed six years ago.

"I definitely rely on my siblings to help me, and likewise. We all have roles to play in the caretaking of mom," she says.

Families Pour Hearts Into Round-the-Clock Alzheimer's Care

Xuan and her brother and two sisters have designed round-the-clock schedules, planning how and when they'll feed their mother, dress her, bathe her and organize her growing list of medications.

"In spite of her memory loss and the changes that she's undergone, she still has moments when she's quite lucid. She still has great moments of joy and laughter," Xuan said.

Through it all, Xuan tries to "engage" her mother -- to reach her and perhaps trigger a few more of those precious moments.

"Every family is different," she said. "But for us, to spend time with her and care for her, I think it's a testament to my mother and our love for her."

Xuan's testament is one echoed each and every day by countless families across the country.

Alzheimer's Association CareSource offers resources to help manage caregiving responsibilities, such as financial decisions and skills for caring with loved ones every day.

On the organization's Web site, you can find message boards, create a calendar to keep track of tasks with your family, and locate assisted living facilities in your area.

The Alzheimer's Association offers a Doctor's Appointment Checklist to help family members prepare for effective doctor visits and keep track of questions.

To see the complete Medicine on the Cutting Edge archive, click here.

-- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 7162746. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 7162746. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 7162746. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 7162746. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 7162746. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 7162746. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 7162746. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 7162746. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 7162746.
Join the Discussion
You are using an outdated version of Internet Explorer. Please click here to upgrade your browser in order to comment.
blog comments powered by Disqus
 
You Might Also Like...
See It, Share It
PHOTO: A home damaged by a landslide Friday, April 18, 2014 in Jackson, Wyo. is shown in this aerial image provided by Tributary Environmental.
Tributary Environmental/AP Photo
null
Danny Martindale/Getty Images
PHOTO: Woman who received lab-grown vagina says she now has normal life.
Metropolitan Autonomous University and Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine