When Is It Safe To Take A Plane After I Have Had A Heart Attack?

Question: When Is It Safe To Take A Plane After I Have Had A Heart Attack?

Answer: After a heart attack, it would generally be safe to fly in an airplane in a two to four week period afterward. But it would depend a little bit about how quickly you'd recovered.

Certainly, you want to make sure that all the heart blockages had been fixed or stented if they needed to.

And so it's important to ask your doctor that question of whether things are really stabilized.

But if they are, and you've regained your strength within a two to four week period, it certainly would be reasonable to be able to fly.

Next: I Have Severe Angina. Should I Ask For Supplemental Oxygen During A Commercial Flight?

null

Previous: What Is The Difference Between Stable And Unstable Angina. Is It Safe To Fly When You Have Stable Angina?
-- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 4221619. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 4221619. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 4221619.
Join the Discussion
You are using an outdated version of Internet Explorer. Please click here to upgrade your browser in order to comment.
blog comments powered by Disqus
 
You Might Also Like...
See It, Share It
PHOTO: The fake baby a man was carrying as he and another woman tried to sneak into the mother and baby unit at Mercy Medical Center in Merced, Calif., hospital officials said.
Dignity Health Security/Mercy Medical Center Merced
Leopard Cub Chills in a Basket
Odd Anderson/AFP/Getty Images
In this image from video posted on Facebook, courtesy of the George W. Bush Presidential Center, former President George W. Bush participates in the ice bucket challenge with the help of his wife, Laura Bush, in Kennebunkport, Maine.
(Courtesy George W. Bush Presidential Center/AP)
PHOTO: Left, actor/comedian Robin Williams arrives at the premiere of Monty Pythons Spamalot in this March 31, 2007, file photo; right, actress Mila Kunis arrives at the Los Angeles premiere of Third Person at Pickford Center for Motion Study.
Ethan Miller/Getty Images| Axelle/Bauer-Griffin/FilmMagic