Mommy Psychic Raises Kids, Communes With Dead

Mommy Psychic Raises Kids, Communes With Dead

Spend any morning with Rebecca Rosen of Denver and you'll see she has a spirited household.

There's 1-year-old Sam, the youngest, shaking his rattle and playing with blocks. There's Jakob, 5, grabbing his lunch and heading out the door for school.

What's a little less obvious in the course of a morning with Rosen are the spirits she told us she hears in her head.

"Right around you," she tells a visitor, "are some dead loved ones. I will go through them, there's three of them."

Right around you. Right around her. Right around all of us. This is Rebecca's reality, and her profession: communicating with the dead.

During business hours she reports to the office like any ordinary professional. But instead of taking calls or filing reports, she works as a psychic medium.

Watch the full story tonight on "Nightline" at 11:35 p.m. ET

"Nightline" sat in the other day on a session between Rosen and two of her regular clients, Shelly and Michael Elick. Our purpose was not to debunk or defend what Rosen does but to see what it is to believe in an invisible world that is trying to make contact.

"I'm going to say a protection prayer to make sure it's good energy coming through," Rosen said. This is how she always starts. And then, within seconds, in a matter-of-fact way, Rebecca began to relay messages from beyond.

The Elicks didn't say much, because why talk when the dead are speaking, especially when they seem to know what they're talking about?

"I'm supposed to bring up the ring," Rosen said. "Did you recently give her a new ring?"

"Yeah," said Shelly Elick, with a laugh.

"Oh Lord," said Michael Elick.

"Your father inspired him to do that," Rosen told Shelly. "[Your father] is more or less saying good work, he's patting you on the back. You will look at [the ring] differently now. That is your father's love and your husband's love."

In such sessions, only Rebecca hears the beyond -- except she says it's not really hearing.

"I do get words, but I have to say there are no sentences," she said. "It would make my life and job so much easier if they talked, actually voices in sentences. What it is it's almost like you're on the phone with a friend and you hang up and you're replaying the conversation in your mind. You can hear their voice but it's coming through your mind's voice. That's what it's like.

"People like to think it's a very Hollywood-type experience where you're actually seeing a dead body standing there and hearing their voice. They don't have bodies, they don't have voices."

'Like the Girl Next Door'

Rosen's sessions include what she calls validations -- evidence that the spirits are for real -- by eliciting some information that only the client could know.

"Feathers are coming up, I don't, I think that's your dad," said Rosen. "He's showing me finding a feather. Did your daughter, is she 2 or 3, did she?"

"Yeah, I thought it was from her boa," said Shelly Elkin. "She found a feather yesterday and brought it to me. It was purple." "That was from your dad," said Rosen.

"OK," said Shelly.

"Anyone who knows me would say I'm like the girl next door," said Rosen, who doesn't dress the part of a gypsy teller: hoop earrings, yes, but no long-flowing robes and the scarves. "That's not me," said Rosen.

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