'Mysteries of the Unseen World': Sneak Peek

National Geographic's new IMAX film explores the wildest sites of the sub-microscopic world.
3:00 | 01/21/14

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Transcript for 'Mysteries of the Unseen World': Sneak Peek
Every once in awhile it's useful to be reminded how much more fascinating our world is beyond surface appearances it has a way of putting things in perspective and tonight. We have some images that do this work. In spectacular fashion. All around us even -- In front of us there is so much that we cannot see. -- new National Geographic 3-D film mysteries of the unseen world. Uses the latest technology to make visible the previously invisible. We're -- things which are either too slow to fast small. Or invisible from the privacy. And hopefully that takes its -- journey of wonder and discovery. Using high speed cameras. They capture images of thousands of times faster than our own vision. Can finally see the unseen. A drop of water landing and bouncing. Lightning shooting up from the ground knocked down as it appears from our eyes. And the greatest flyer in nature -- dragonfly. A creature capable of flying backwards and forwards and even upside down. What you discover is set its four wings actually can individually did that we can study insects. And learn. From the trial and error and researched and nature's son for a hundred million years how to create -- -- flying machines. And it's not just days that moved too quickly for our -- by using time lapse imagery we can see things that moved too slowly for us to appreciate. Plants growing animals decomposing. The film also reveals incredible creatures. Way too small to be seen by the naked guy. An electron microscope can zoom in so far some animal features become unrecognizable. And to many of us unbelievable. The skin of a shark. At Caterpillar's mouth. The -- of a fruit fly. And egg -- A fleet. It's the fact that in the ordinary is the extraordinary. And that we need to open our eyes and be able to appreciate. -- of life that surround you. What's the point of all this to show us that our world is even more interesting than we knew and to put our own lives. In perspective. To create that sense of wonder to take the blinders off and realize that we live in this one hero perspective they think this mankind. Can you know sometimes become arrogant that's why we sometimes destroy our environment because we don't realize were connected to all of it.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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