Sarah Palin's Unconventional Campaign Continues With Debut of 'Real American Stories'

Sarah Palin's unconventional potential campaign for president continued Thursday evening with the debut of "Real American Stories."

The first installment of Palin's new periodic series, which aired at 10:00 p.m. ET on the Fox News Channel, is the latest reminder of how Palin is attempting to rewrite the rules of American politics.

VIDEO: LL Cool J accuses Fox News of unfairly using him to promote Sarah Palins show.
LL Cool J Takes on Sarah Palin

Since quitting her job as governor of Alaska, Palin has written a best-selling memoir, posted provocative messages on Facebook, delivered paid speeches, stumped for conservative candidates, touted Sen. John McCain's, R-Ariz., re-election bid in Arizona, and provided political commentary on the Fox News Channel.

Palin's latest effort on behalf of the Fox News Channel allowed her to associate herself with "inspirational real-life tales of overcoming adversity" as she continues to preach against the evils of government activism.

There is nothing new about a politician recounting heroic stories.

But Palin's effort to celebrate the American spirit differs from efforts made by other politicians because of the journalistic hat that she wears for the Fox News Channel.

Instead of regularly submitting to press interviews from a variety of news organizations the way that potential Republican rivals Mitt Romney and Tim Pawlenty do, Palin plays the role of the storyteller.

In her Thursday program, Palin mixed taped pieces with interviews in front of a studio audience.

In an effort to juice up interest in the program, Palin tweeted the following message on Thursday: "America is EXCEPTIONAL! I'll show you a few 'ordinary' Americans do extraordinary things on 'Real American Stories' tonight on FOX, 10 pm EST."

These are the "real American stories" that Palin featured on Thursday:

**A Wall Street financier who puts inner city kids through college.

**A 22-year old Marine who put his helmet on a grenade in Iraq so that his friends would live.

**An 11-year old with cerebral palsy who learned to walk with the help of a black lab.

**Jack Welch recounting how he started with nothing but eventually became CEO of General Electric.

**Toby Keith, inspired by his dad's military service, performing for servicemembers in hard-to-reach places in the wake of 9-11.

**A Latina who stopped her car and rescued a trucker who had caught on fire when his vehicle flipped over.

One person who did not appear in the first installment of "Real American Stories" is James Todd Smith, the rapper-turned-actor better known as LL Cool J.

LL Cool J Says Fox Never Received His Permission

The Fox News Channel removed LL Cool J from the debut of its Palin-hosted series after he saw himself in a commercial for it and then aired his grievance on Twitter.

"Fox lifted an old interview I gave in 2008 to someone else & are misrepresenting to the public in order to promote Sarah Palin's Show. WOW," he tweeted.

A spokesperson for LL Cool J said that Fox never obtained the actor's permission to use the 2008 interview clip in Palin's debut program.

FNC responded with a statement saying that it "did not commit to restrictions on its interview with Mr. Smith so therefore the network did not need his permission to use the interview in this program."

Nevertheless, FNC agreed to remove the LL Cool J segment.

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