The World Has Changed So Much During Vin Scully's Announcing Career

PHOTO: Broadcaster Vin Scully acknowledges the crowd at Dodger Stadium during a baseball game between the Los Angeles Dodgers and the Atlanta Braves, July 29, 2014, in Los Angeles.
Share
Copy

Vin Scully is timeless.

The 86-year-old Hall of Fame baseball announcer will return for his 66th season with the Dodgers in 2015, a record.

"God willing, I will be back next year," he said in a statement released by the team. "Naturally, there will come a time when I have to say goodbye, but I've soul-searched and this is not the time."

Scully’s return was announced during Tuesday’s Dodgers game against the Atlanta Braves, in a video message featuring players Hyun-Jin Ryu, Yasiel Puig and Justin Turner.

The news was greeted with loud cheers and a prolonged standing ovation for Scully, who stood and waved to fans from his booth. His wife, Sandra, was also on hand, and the two hugged.

PHOTO: Broadcaster Vin Scully, left, embraces his wife, Sandra, after his 2015 return was announced, July 29, 2014, in Los Angeles.
Jae C. Hong/AP Photo
PHOTO: Broadcaster Vin Scully, left, embraces his wife, Sandra, after his 2015 return was announced, July 29, 2014, in Los Angeles.

“Boy, it’s tough to get over that,” Scully said after settling back behind the microphone.

“All I can say is thank God, and please God, for another year.”

Scully's consecutive years of service make him the longest-tenured broadcaster with one team in sports history.

So much has changed in those six decades, from social issues and popular culture to technological advancements. But Scully has endured, a steady, soothing voice for generations of baseball fans. When Scully began broadcasting Dodgers games in 1950:

1. The team played its home games at Ebbets Field in Brooklyn. The Dodgers moved to Los Angeles following the 1957 season, and Scully accompanied the team west.

2. Jackie Robinson was three years removed from breaking baseball’s color barrier.

3. Baseball legends Mickey Mantle and Willie Mays hadn’t debuted in the majors. That would occur in 1951.

4. Joe Paterno was months away from making his coaching debut at Penn State. Paterno served as the team’s assistant coach until 1965 and head coach from 1966 until 2011.

5. Harry S. Truman was president.

PHOTO: Harry S. Truman is pictured at the wheel of his 1945 de luxe two-door Ford sedan, a present from Henry Ford in August, 1945.
Keystone/Getty Images
PHOTO: Harry S. Truman is pictured at the wheel of his 1945 de luxe two-door Ford sedan, a present from Henry Ford in August, 1945.

6. Current President Barack Obama wasn’t alive.

7. Twelve different U.S. presidents have served during Scully’s tenure broadcasting with the Dodgers.

8. Twenty-four current members of the National Baseball Hall of Fame hadn’t been born:

  • George Brett
  • Robin Yount
  • Kirby Puckett
  • Dave Winfield
  • Ozzie Smith
  • Gary Carter
  • Eddie Murray
  • Dennis Eckersley
  • Paul Molitor
  • Wade Boggs
  • Ryne Sandberg
  • Bruce Sutter
  • Tony Gwynn
  • Cal Ripken, Jr.
  • Rich “Goose” Gossage
  • Rickey Henderson
  • Jim Rice
  • Andre Dawson
  • Roberto Alomar
  • Bert Blyleven
  • Barry Larkin
  • Tom Glavine
  • Greg Maddux
  • Frank Thomas
  • PHOTO: National Baseball Hall of Fame inductee Greg Maddux speaks during an induction ceremony at the Clark Sports Center, July 27, 2014, in Cooperstown, N.Y.
    Mike Groll/AP Photo
    PHOTO: National Baseball Hall of Fame inductee Greg Maddux speaks during an induction ceremony at the Clark Sports Center, July 27, 2014, in Cooperstown, N.Y.

    9. Newspaper publisher William Randolph Hearst was still alive. So was Soviet Union leader Joseph Stalin, impressionist painter Henri Matisse and physicist Albert Einstein.

    10. Transcontinental television broadcasts were one year away.

    11. The most popular song in the country was “If I Knew You Were Comin’ I’d’ve Baked a Cake,” by Eileen Barton.

    12. Philadelphia Phillies pitcher Jim Konstanty was the National League’s Most Valuable Player that season.

    13. Twelve Major League Baseball teams had yet to integrate -- with the last of those teams, the Boston Red Sox, integrating in 1959.

    14. Crooner Tony Bennett hadn’t recorded his first major hit song.

    PHOTO: Tony Bennett, right, and Lady Gaga attend a concert taping, July 28, 2014, in New York.
    Andy Kropa/Invision/AP Photo
    PHOTO: Tony Bennett, right, and Lady Gaga attend a concert taping, July 28, 2014, in New York.

    15. The animated film “Cinderella” was in movie theaters.

    16. Postage stamps cost 3 cents.

    17. The fast food chain McDonald's didn't exist.

    PHOTO: Customers have a meal at a McDonalds restaurant in Tokyo, July 22, 2014.
    Shizuo Kambayashi/AP Photo
    PHOTO: Customers have a meal at a McDonald's restaurant in Tokyo, July 22, 2014.

    The Associated Press contributed to this report.

    Join the Discussion
    You are using an outdated version of Internet Explorer. Please click here to upgrade your browser in order to comment.
    blog comments powered by Disqus
     
    You Might Also Like...
    See It, Share It
    A Gilchrist county sheriffs car sits at the end of a trailer home where 7 members of a family were slain by their grandfather in Bell, FL, Thursday, Sept., 18, 2014. The grandfather, Don Spirit, pictured, also killed himself.
    Phil Sandlin/AP Photo | Gilchrist County Sheriffs Office
    PHOTO:
    St. Andre Bessette Catholic Church in Ecorse Michigan
    PHOTO: Phoenix police officers escort Arizona Cardinals running back Jonathan Dwyer, to the 4th Avenue Jail following his arrest, Sept. 17, 2014 in Phoenix.
    The Arizona Republic, David Kadlubowski/AP Photo