Meet the Israeli Software Developer Who Wishes His App Wasn't Needed

PHOTO: Ari Sprung us a software developer based in Jerusalem, Israel.

For people who follow "RedAlertIsrael" on the "Yo" app, the number of push alerts over the past few days indicating predicted rocket attacks in Israeli territory have been staggering.

The serious new use for the whimsical "Yo" app —- which shows a barrage of reported rocket attacks -— is meant to complement the existing Red Alert Israel app developed by Ari Sprung and Kobi Snir.

Sprung, a Jerusalem-based software developer, told ABC News over email that he first put his tech expertise to work two years ago when he coded late at night with Snir to create the Red Alert Israel app.

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Earlier this month, the duo realized they could find a use for the "Yo" app.

Thousands of subscribers from around the world can receive alerts from both apps, however Sprung said if they were in Israel, they would "hear a loud siren that is going up and down, lots of people running for shelter."

"You obviously have the hugely successful Iron Dome that is literally knocking missiles out of the sky that are targeted at Israeli women and children, and then you have efforts like ours which is helping to keep people informed and notify them when they must run and seek shelter," he said.

PHOTO: Sample screens from the Red Alert: Israel iPhone app, which the makers claim, provides real time alerts every time a terrorist fires rockets, mortars or missiles into the State of Israel.
Apple
PHOTO: Sample screens from the "Red Alert: Israel" iPhone app, which the makers claim, "provides real time alerts every time a terrorist fires rockets, mortars or missiles into the State of Israel."

Sprung said the information for the apps comes in coordination with the Israeli Defense Forces, however he declined to share more information due to security concerns.

While tech may be playing a "huge role" in the operation, Sprung said he would welcome the day he didn't have to work on something so grave.

"I wish I could unpublish the app in the near future," he said.

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