Your Twitter Archive: You Can Now See all Your Old Tweets

PHOTO: In Dec. 2012 Twitter began allowing users to see their old tweets.

Get ready to spend even more time reading tweets and not ones from others. Today, Twitter started to roll out a feature that allows users to download and view all their tweets.

Yes, surprisingly, you haven't been able to go back in to your tweet history (or twistory!) until today.

"Today, we're introducing the ability to download your Twitter archive, so you'll get all your Tweets (including Retweets) going back to the beginning," Twitter's Mollie announced on the company's blog this morning. "Once you have your Twitter archive, you can view your Tweets by month, or search your archive to find Tweets with certain words, phrases, hashtags or @usernames. You can even engage with your old Tweets just as you would with current ones."

MORE: Top Twitter Trends of 2012

So how do you get to your old tweets?

Head to the Settings menu on Twitter.com and at the bottom you will see a button to "Request your archive." Click on that and Twitter will then email you with the instructions on how to download your archive.

When you download the file sent by Twitter you will be able to open the file in your web browser and view your tweets and even share them. It's an offline file, but you can view it in your browser and even view the Tweet on Twitter. You can't retweet your own tweets since Twitter doesn't actually let you retweet yourself.

Twitter has also organized your tweets by year and then month. You can hover over the months and see how many times you tweeted at a specific time over the last few years.

Twitter says this feature will begin rolling out to everyone today -- if you don't have it just yet, it's on the way. Just get ready to sift through a few more tweets soon.

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