Ferguson Police Receive Body Camera Donation

PHOTO: Police officers wear what appear to be body cameras as they hold the line against protesters gathered at the police station during a rally in Ferguson, Mo. on Aug. 30, 2014.

A mobile video surveillance company has donated body cameras to the Ferguson Police Department, the Missouri police department that has been roiled by protests after an unarmed teenager was shot and killed by a police officer.

Witnesses claimed the teenager, Michael Brown, was surrendering and putting up his hands when he was shot at least six times. Defenders of the police officer, Darren Wilson, claim the officer suffered a serious facial injury in his confrontation with Brown and that the teenager was moving toward Wilson when he fired.

The Ferguson police department did not have body cameras at the time of the encounter. A state grand jury is hearing evidence in the case and the Justice Department is also looking into the shooting.

Safety Vision, a Texas-based manufacturer of video equipment for law enforcement agencies, has donated five body cameras to the Ferguson police department.

In a statement released on their website, the company said the donation was made "in an effort to protect both law enforcement and the public with the capture of indisputable evidence."

The body cameras have eight hours of recording life and a police radio interface, according to the company's website.

The number of police departments in the U.S. using body cameras has been increasing, according to the Associated Press.

Approximately one in six U.S. police departments use body cameras in some form, Scott Greenwood, an attorney at the American Civil Liberties Union said.

The Ferguson Police Department did not return ABC News' request for comment.

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