Middle School Drug Testing: Effective Deterrent or Overbearing Policy?

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"Heroin is making a big comeback, it's becoming more popular," Warner said. "It's one of those things that is not extraordinarily expensive, for the user to get, it's pretty accessible."

Warner said random drug testing is working, and there has been just one positive test in six years.

But Pleasant Middle School only tests student athletes -- kids who have big incentives not to get caught.

"Does that mean that every kid is identified or kids are getting away with it? I don't think it means that, it means, in a large part, it's effective," he said. "Parents who have spoken to me about it have always been positive about it... they want to know-- 'if my kids using, I want to know about it.'"

But even though the U.S. Supreme Court ruled random drug testing for high school athletes is constitutional, the Kiederers won an injunction that prevented Delaware Valley Middle School from enforcing the policy. It mean Alexis and Meghan Kiederer were allowed to play again, while the issue went to Pennsylvania's Supreme Court.

"Clubs or after-school activities are normally a way for kids to not be involved in drugs," Kathy Kiederer said. "It gives them something to do after school versus going home to an empty house and maybe getting into things they shouldn't be getting into."

Kiederer argued there are better ways to teach children about drugs.

"Throwing up the barrier of having to be drug tested for it might prevent those kids from even trying out," she said.

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