Car Danger: Surviving Life-Threatening Severe Weather in Your Vehicle

What everyone needs to know to stay alive and prevent car fatalities.
1:44 | 04/04/13

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Transcript for Car Danger: Surviving Life-Threatening Severe Weather in Your Vehicle
And today, some of the nation's top meteorologists, gathered in washington to give their urgent attention to fatal car crashes and how to prevent them. It turns out, all the dangers of severe weather, the biggest one is getting in your car and hitting the road. Abc's david kerley with some surprising new solutions tonight. Reporter: It can happen in an instant. Ice -- fog -- you may never see it coming. It is a killer on the roads. One out of every four car crashes caused by weather. More than 7,000 americans killed every year -- statistics that led to today's meeting. People just don't have any information in the vehicle itself about what's happening, what's coming up, what's around the next corner. Reporter: Technology may be the life saver. Already, these stationary weather stations on interstates help feed electronic signs warning of danger ahead. But here is what's coming in about a decade. Self-contained weather station in your car. Sensors will measure temperature, moisture, atmospheric pressure and tell you if black ice, hail, fog or other weather hazards are ahead. But that's not all. That data will be sent wirelessly to computer centers which will then feed information back to your car and other -- others driving in the same area, with even more details warnings. In the future, there's no reason not to know what's ahead. Reporter: In the meantime, lives can be saved if some simple advice is followed. In bad weather, don't drive the speed limit. Slow down. Don't tailgate. Keep more distance from the vehicle in front of you. And to avoid spinning out on slick roads, brake softly. Advice that will still work even when our cars start telling us things we can't even see. David kerley, abc news, washington.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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