Making Children Safer in Schools

Sobering new report suggests 28 percent of schools can do more to protect children in an emergency.
1:54 | 09/04/13

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Transcript for Making Children Safer in Schools
Now to american schools today as children are returning a sobering report revealing that in half of allstate's, 28 schools and daycare centers could do more to protect children during an emergency. Abc's solteve osunsami with a solution that is working. Reporter: For parents worried that these pictures from high school shootings across the country could be repeated at their school, today's report isn't comforting. It says that schools in these 28 states are failing to meet minimum government standards for evacuation procedures, reuniting children with their families during a crisis and basic school safety. But here's a school system that gets an a-plus. Teachers and students pardon or announcements. Reporter: Leigh colburn is a principle at georgia's marietta high, with more than 100 high-def security cameras, two city police and halls designed straight with no corners for a gunman to hide. You have to understand that it can happen anywhere. There's nothing that our patents want us to take more seriously than security. Reporter: And this year, every school in the district has installed at least one of these. It looks like a thermostat, but it's a panic button, in secret locations with a direct line to the calvary at this emergency call center across town. This is really a "break glass only in case of emergency" type of situation. Reporter: The experts give this advice to parents who don't live in marietta. Go to your school and ask questions. What's the security plan if there's a problem? Does the school do drills? And will first responders have lists of children's names and their parents? They say to demand answers and back to school night make safety issue number one. Steve osunsami, abc news, atlanta. And if you want to look at the school emergency measures in your state, go to abcnews.Com.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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