'Concussion': 5 Takeaways From Will Smith's New Film

PHOTO: Will Smith attends a special screening of "Focus" at Vue West End, Feb. 11, 2015, in London.PlayFred Duval/Getty Images
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Will Smith, 46, is definitely going to get a ton of Oscar buzz portraying Dr. Bennet Omalu in the new film "Concussion." NFL columnist Peter King of Sports Illustrated got an exclusive first peek at the trailer and it has been widely shared on social media since. And it's very chilling.

Here are five takeaways and background you need to know before checking out the clip:

1 - It's Based on a True Story

Omalu is the forensic pathologist and neuropathologist who discovered chronic traumatic encephalopathy in football players who got hit in the head over and over again, according to the Washington Post.

In the clip, he says repetitive "head trauma chokes the brain."

Omalu was one of the founding members of the Brain Injury Research Institute in 2002. He conducted the autopsy of Pittsburgh Steelers center Mike Webster, played by David Morse in the film, which led to this discovery.

2 - Smith's Version of Omalu's Accent Is Spot On

Omalu is from Nigeria and Smith has been known to transform completely for a role. He was nominated for an Oscar for 2011's "Ali," playing the legendary Muhammad Ali.

For comparison, here's Omalu's PBS interview from 2013.

3 - Smith Is a Reluctant Hero

"If you don't speak for them, who will," Gugu Mbatha-Raw, who plays Prema Mutiso in the film, tells Smith's character.

He admits he idolized America growing up and "was the wrong person to have discovered this."

4 - Alec Baldwin and Luke Wilson

"Concussion" brought in some heavyweights for this movie. Baldwin plays Dr. Julian Bailes, who advises Omalu, and Wilson, who will reportedly play NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell, according to IMDB. There's no official word on this. He's seen at a podium in the trailer, but doesn't speak.

5 - "Tell the Truth"

Smith captures Omalu's passion to have the truth told about this injury and disease.

"I was afraid of letting Mike [Webster] down. I was afraid. I don't know. I was afraid I was going to fail," Omalu told PBS a couple years back.