Lena Dunham Calls Jennifer Lawrence's Essay on Hollywood's Pay Gap 'Profound'

PHOTO: Lena Dunham attends "Its Me, Hilary: The Man Who Drew Eloise" New York screening at The Plaza Hotel on March 16, 2015 in New York City.Mireya Acierto/Getty Images
Lena Dunham attends "It's Me, Hilary: The Man Who Drew Eloise" New York screening at The Plaza Hotel on March 16, 2015 in New York City.

Jennifer Lawrence made headlines two weeks ago after penning an essay on the gender pay gap in Hollywood for Lena Dunham's newsletter, Lenny. Now the "Girls" star is sharing her thoughts on Lawrence's public stance.

Dunham previously called Lawrence's essay "brave and beautiful," and in an interview with Entertainment Weekly, the screenwriter elaborated on why she believes Lawrence's words had such an impact on readers.

"It was clearly something that [Lawrence] had been ready to write and that she was ready to express," Dunham said. "And we’re very glad she did!"

In the essay, the "Hunger Games" actress revealed that she regrets not asking for more money during negotiations for her role in the 2013 film "American Hustle."

Dunham said Lawrence's essay needed very little editing.

"She truly had the clearest sense of what she wanted to say," said Dunham. "It just popped right out of her skull that way. And you know, obviously the message is amazing, but it’s just, she has a great tone as a writer. I think that honesty and that humor she’s just able to convey when she’s talking about an incredibly challenging, a pretty emotional topic, made it."

Dunham stated that the part of Lawrence's essay that impacted her the most was when Lawrence admitted that she did not speak up more during her "American Hustle" contract negotiations because she didn't want to come off as "difficult" or "spoiled," and wanted to remain likable.

"I think the fact that Jen was able to articulate that we spend so much time on our delivery that we forget about our message is so profound," said Dunham.

Dunham also reflected on how the gender pay gap is not just an issue in Hollywood, but one that affects society as a whole.

"If Jennifer Lawrence feels this pressure, imagine what it’s like for women who don’t necessarily have that power and profile," said Dunham. "I’m just so glad that that was the dialogue that she was able to begin."

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