Sydney Living Museums
  • Mugshots From the 1920s

    The Sydney Living Museums released a collection of incredible images of criminals from the 1920s. This image shows Clara Randall at the State Reformatory for Women, Long Bay, NSW, Nov. 12, 1923. Randall reported to police that her Bondi flat had been broken into and a quantity of jewelry stolen. It was later discovered she had pawned the jewelry for cash.
    Sydney Living Museums
  • Mugshots From the 1920s

    Doris Poole appeared before the Newtown Police Court charged with stealing jewelry and clothing. She had previously been convicted on a similar charge in North Sydney and received a six-month sentence with light labor.
    Sydney Living Museums
  • Mugshots From the 1920s

    Elizabeth Singleton had multiple convictions for soliciting and was described in police records as a ?common prostitute?. She was imprisoned at Long Bay but the details of her sentence have been lost. Singleton was charged with soliciting, common prostitute and vagrancy.
    Sydney Living Museums
  • Mugshots From the 1920s

    Alice Clarke at the State Reformatory for Women, Long Bay, NSW, April 3, 1916. Clarke was convicted of selling liquor without a license. Clarke was an entrepreneur who took advantage of restrictive liquor regulations, which forced pubs to close at 6pm. As a "sly grogger" she sold high-priced alcohol from a private residence. Clarke's arrest came only weeks after the legislation was introduced.
    Sydney Living Museums
  • Mugshots From the 1920s

    Annie Gunderson was charged with stealing a fur coat from a Sydney department store called Winn's Limited, in 1922. Police records do not indicate whether the fur she is wearing is the stolen item.
    Sydney Living Museums
  • Mugshots From the 1920s

    Alice Adeline Cooke, State Reformatory for Women, Long Bay, NSW, Dec. 30, 1922. Cooke was convicted of bigamy and theft. By the age of 24, Alice Cooke had amassed an impressive number of aliases and at least two husbands. Described by police as 'rather good looking', Cooke was a habitual thief and a convicted bigamist.
    Sydney Living Museums
  • Mugshots From the 1920s

    Emily Gertrude Hemsworth at the State Reformatory for Women, Long Bay, NSW, May 14, 1925. Hemsworth killed her three-week-old son but could not remember any details of the murder. She was found not guilty due to insanity. Hemsworth was to be detained in custody until judged fit to return to society - it is unknown if she was ever released.
    Sydney Living Museums
  • Mugshots From the 1920s

    Eileen May O'Connor at the State Reformatory for Women, Long Bay, NSW, June 3, 1927. O'Connor was convicted of stealing. Eileen O'Connor first appears in police records as a 'missing friend', or missing person. She is eventually arrested for stealing a wallet and is described by police with the odd epithet "inclined to be weak."
    Sydney Living Museums
  • Mugshots From the 1920s

    Alma Henrietta Agnes Smith at the State Reformatory for Women, Long Bay, NSW, Aug. 29, 1929. Smith worked as an illegal abortionist in the northern NSW town of Tamworth. A young woman, who later died as the result of a botched abortion, identified Smith as the abortionist. Smith denied knowing the woman but was convicted and sentenced to five years.
    Sydney Living Museums
  • Mugshots From the 1920s

    Edith Florence Ashton at the State Reformatory for Women, Long Bay, NSW, Aug. 29, 1929. Edith Ashton was a backyard abortionist who also dabbled in theft and fencing stolen goods. Described in the media as a 'social somebody' and an 'equestrienne' she was, however, not adept at performing abortions and was suspected of contributing to the deaths of at least two women.
    Sydney Living Museums
  • Mugshots From the 1920s

    Dorothy Mort at the State Reformatory for Women, Long Bay, NSW, Oct. 16, 1929. Mort was having an affair with dashing young doctor Claude Tozer. On December 21, 1920 Tozer visited Mort's home intending to break off the relationship. Mort shot him dead and then attempted to commit suicide. She was released from gaol shortly after this photograph was taken and disappeared from the public eye.
    Sydney Living Museums
  • Mugshots From the 1920s

    Elizabeth Ruddy was a career criminal who was convicted of stealing from the house of one Andrew Foley. She was sentenced to 12 months with hard labour. Ruddy was charged with stealing in a dwelling, drunk and stealing.
    Sydney Living Museums
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