Review: Grisham's 'The Guardians' is suspenseful thriller

Author John Grisham explores the world of defense attorneys working for little pay and prestige to help innocent people who are incarcerated in 'The Guardians.'

"The Guardians: a Novel," published by Doubleday, by John Grisham

In John Grisham's latest novel, "The Guardians," a former priest named Cullen Post works for an organization called Guardian Ministries that scours court transcripts and personal letters from convicts to determine if someone is wrongfully imprisoned for a crime he or she didn't commit. If the organization believes without a doubt that the potential client is innocent, it will do everything it can within the boundaries of the law to free an innocent person, investigating and pushing for a new trial.

Quincy Miller has been in prison for 22 years — and still claims his innocence. A young lawyer was murdered, and suspicion quickly turned to Miller pulling the trigger. He says a fellow inmate fabricated a story about Miller confessing, and his ex-wife claimed that he owned several guns, which also wasn't true. Another witness lied about seeing him flee the scene. Miller swears he never owned a gun, wasn't anywhere in the area that night and that a key piece of evidence that later disappeared was planted.

It's a bit much to believe that so many folks would be involved in a miscarriage of justice, but Post believes Miller and begins to dig into what happened that fateful night.

Grisham again delivers a suspenseful thriller mixed with powerful themes such as false incarceration, the death penalty and how the legal system shows prejudice. The Guardian team of characters is first-rate, and Miller's attitude and mannerisms will have readers questioning what truth means in the world of the legal system.

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Online:

https://www.jgrisham.com/