Review: 'Klara and the Sun' is a poignant mediation on love

In “Klara and the Sun,” Kazuo Ishiguro takes readers on a journey through the mind of Klara, one of many artificial friends who have been built to keep lonely children company

“Klara and the Sun,” by Kazuo Ishiguro (Knopf)

“Klara and the Sun,” by Nobel-winning writer Kazuo Ishiguro, takes readers on a journey through the mind of Klara, one of many artificial friends who have been built to keep lonely children company. Klara is a one-of-a-kind machine whose keen observational abilities are consistently praised by the human beings who meet her. She may be a machine, but her thoughts and emotions are deeply real.

Ishiguro creates a fascinating world through Klara’s eyes as she works to understand how humans operate, while at the same time working through a growing number of feelings of her own. Throughout the book, Klara is more or less treated as a person and sometimes, you may even forget that she isn’t one.

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