Olivia Wilde says publicly being served custody papers at CinemaCon was ‘really vicious’

"It was really upsetting," the actress and filmmaker said.

August 24, 2022, 2:21 PM

Olivia Wilde is opening up about publicly being served custody papers earlier this year at CinemaCon while promoting her upcoming film, " Don't Worry Darling."

In an interview with Variety, Wilde said the incident was “really vicious.”

PHOTO: Olivia Wilde and Jason Sudeikis are pictured in a composite file image.
Olivia Wilde and Jason Sudeikis are pictured in a composite file image.
Getty Images, FILE

“It was my workplace,” Wilde said in Variety without naming her ex-fiancé Jason Sudeikis. "In any other workplace, it would be seen as an attack. It was really upsetting. It shouldn't have been able to happen."

Following the CinemaCon incident, Sudeikis said he "deeply regret[s] what happened" and has reiterated that he had no control over it.

"Olivia's talk was an important event for Olivia, both professionally and personally, and I am very, very sorry that the incident marred her special moment," Sudeikis said in court documents.

PHOTO: Actress Olivia Wilde speaks onstage during the Warner Bros. Pictures "The Big Picture" presentation during CinemaCon 2022 at Caesars Palace, April 26, 2022, in Las Vegas.
Actress Olivia Wilde speaks onstage during the Warner Bros. Pictures "The Big Picture" presentation during CinemaCon 2022 at Caesars Palace, April 26, 2022, in Las Vegas.
Greg Doherty/Getty Images

For Wilde, CinemaCon was a professional milestone as she was about to screen footage from her film, which she directed. She was onstage for the presentation when she received an envelope that was marked "personal and confidential." Inside were documents from Sudeikis regarding their two children, Otis, 8, and Daisy, 5, and a petition to have their case heard in New York.

Wilde said there was a "huge breach in security" that day, which she says was "really scary" for her.

PHOTO: Olivia Wilde at Los Angeles County Museum of Art on Nov. 6, 2021 in Los Angeles.
Olivia Wilde at Los Angeles County Museum of Art on Nov. 6, 2021 in Los Angeles.
Taylor Hill/WireImage via Getty Images, FILE

"The hurdles that you had to jump through to get into that room with several badges, plus special COVID tests that had to be taken days in advance, which gave you wristbands that were necessary to gain access to the event -- this was something that required forethought," she told the outlet.

Earlier this month, a judge dismissed Sudeikis' custody petition and sided with Wilde, saying that their case can be heard in Los Angeles, which has been the home state of their children.

Looking back on the incident now, Wilde said that those who were hurt the most were their kids.

"They'll have to see that, and they shouldn't ever have to know what happened," Wilde told Variety.

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